December 7th, 2012

Use Hypermedia to Reduce Mobile Deployment Costs

Using Hypermedia to Reduce CostsI speak about the power and flexibility of hypermedia quite often. I explain the general idea behind hypermedia, discuss its historical roots and show how it can help client applications adapt to changes in data input and application flow. Essentially, a hypermedia-based approach aims to take key elements often placed into the client’s source code and move them into the actual response messages sent by the server.

I also point out that using a hypermedia-based approach to building client and server applications takes a different kind of effort than using RPC-style approaches. And I explain that, currently, there is a limited amount of tooling available to support the process of designing, implementing and maintaining hypermedia-style systems.

If your work involves designing, building, testing and deploying a mobile client application, it is likely you need to deal with an “application store” or some other process where your packaged application must be submitted for review and approval before it is available to users for download. This can happen not only with well-known public offerings such as the Apple Store but also within any organization that provides its own application repository aimed at ensuring the safety and consistency of user-available mobile apps.

In an environment of quick-turnaround, agile-style implementations this “app store” approval can be a real bottleneck. It may be not just days but weeks before your app is tested, approved and posted. This can be especially frustrating when you want to deploy a rapid-fire series of enhancements in response to an engaged user community.

A hypermedia-based client design can often support UI, data transfer and workflow modifications by altering the server messages rather than altering the client source code. By doing this, it is possible to improve both the user experience and the system functionality without the need for re-submitting the client code for “app store” review and re-deployment. This also has the potential to reduce the need for interrupting a user’s day with download and reinstall events and can, in the process, cut down on the bandwidth costs incurred during the repeated roll outs of code modifications to a potentially large user base.

Improved agility, a better user experience and reduced bandwidth costs are all tangible benefits that are possible when investing in a hypermedia-based implementation for your mobile client application.

1 Comment »

  1. Agree, I’d add some further advice to this:

    In practical terms the most cost effective way to achieve this is to use HTML.

    Ideally your app should just be developed and distributed as a web app (i.e. avoiding app stores altogether). If you absolutely have to distribute via an app store there are projects such as PhoneGap/Cordova which you can use to wrap your web app in the necessary shell and gain access to device functions reserved for ‘native’ apps.

    Comment by Mike Kelly — December 8, 2012 @ 1:13 pm

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