May 29th, 2014

Toward a Lean API Strategy

Books on Lean Business Strategy“Lean”, “API” and “IoT” are probably the most hyped terms in our industry right now. Normally, I tend to blog about the latter two but – for a change – I would like to balance that out by talking about the former: the concept of Lean and how it relates APIs.

You have probably heard about or even read The Lean Startup by Eric Ries. And you may have noticed that this book sparked a whole cottage industry of Lean publications, like Lean Analytics, Lean UX and the widely-misunderstood concept of “minimal viable product”.

But few of you may have ventured back to explore the texts that laid the foundation for the Lean startup. The Four Steps to the Epiphany by Steve Blank, for example. Blank outlines a business process called “customer development”, which helps startups find “problem solution” and “product market” fit. Even fewer will have ventured right back to the very origins of the Lean concept: the Toyota Lean Production System with its emphasis on pull over push and ever-decreasing batch size towards one-piece-flow manufacturing. And we have not even touched upon the “theory of disruptive innovation” that Clayton Christensen outlines in The Innovator’s Dilemma or Rita McGrath’s concept of “discovery-driven planning” outlined in Discovery Driven Growth.

But the purpose of this post is not to provide a comprehensive reading list for those of you hoping to learn more about Lean and discovery-driven business strategies. My real goal is to explore if and how these concepts can be applied to API design best practices. However, if you are curious and want to know more about the books mentioned, I suggest you head over to a blog post I wrote for launchd.io. And for your next long-haul flight, you might want to consider starting with The Goal, which will provide you with some truly novel-like business reading.

Before I explore how Lean and API design come together, let me first make a confession – I got an MBA a couple of years back. I know that this is not going to win me any brownie points and I still prefer code to spreadsheets – no contest! But it goes some way to explaining why I think business and API are joined at the hip. The business value of an API does not come from the interface’s intrinsic technical features but from its ability to provide access to a business asset or service. APIs provide a technical means to do (more) business.

From this follows the assumption that API design and implementation need to focus on the intended business outcome. Which means that you must have a clear view of your business goals before you can start to implement your strategy. Unfortunately – in my experience – most of us on the technical side are not equipped to talk to the business side of the house (and they are seldom well prepared to talk with us). This is why I went back and got an MBA – so that I could learn to speak with “them” and build better products.

Starting with Toyota’s lean product development process, I began to see approaches and tools that could help bridge the semantic gap between the technical and business sides. I plan to share some of these with you in subsequent posts. I will start by discussing Alexander Osterwalder’s Business Model Canvas. To get a little background on what I’ll be talking about in my next post, I suggest that you read this post on ProgrammableWeb, where Mark Boyd uses the Business Model Canvas to analyze Walgreens’ QuickPrints API. Also, you might want to take a look at my Lean API Strategy presentation from the recent APIdays in Berlin.

1 Comment »

  1. [...] Layer7 Blog: Towards Lean API Strategy [...]

    Pingback by Layer7 Blog: Towards Lean API Strategy | Holger Reinhardt — May 30, 2014 @ 7:40 am

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