November 5th, 2013

Thoughts on Trends in IoT & Mobile Security

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IoT and Mobile SecurityRecently, I read an article about predicted growth in the Internet of Things (IoT). Extrapolating a previous estimation from Cisco, Morgan Stanley is predicting there will be 75 billion connected devices by 2020. This sort of math exercise is entertaining and has a real “wow” factor but the real question here is: What does this mean for consumers and enterprises?

In recent years, consumer electronics manufactures have started to see the usefulness of building Internet connectivity into their appliances. This enables the post-sales delivery of service upgrades and enhanced features. It also allows mobile apps to control home appliances remotely. This is nothing radical per se, a decade ago I observed a sauna in the Nokia Research Center’s lab being controlled by voice and WML. But this was still a simple one-off integration. As the number of device form factors increases, the complexity of integrating devices grows. The term “anytime, anywhere computing” is usually used to describe this scenario but it isn’t entirely adequate. As a consumer I don’t only want device-independent access to a service – I want the various devices and appliances to work with each other so that smarter interactions can be achieved.

Today, we already see a plethora of connected devices with more-or-less crude connectivity and integration options. Smartphones can sync and connect with tablets, TVs and laptops. Mostly, these are very basic integrations, such as your various devices “knowing” about the last page you read in an eBook, regardless of which device you used. But the number and complexity of these integrations will increase greatly in the coming years.

The Coming Age of Connectivity
One of the main reasons the iPhone revolutionized mobile computing was Apple’s focus on user experience. Since then, mobile vendors have battled to see who could provide the best experience within the device. The next battle will be over cross-device experiences within the broader ecosystem, as users roam from device to device. And in the battle, the big players will keep adding their own proprietary components (software and hardware). The sheer size of these ecosystems will make the opportunity large enough to attract even more mindshare. If you make money – who cares about proprietary protocols and connectors?

But how does this relate to IoT, you may ask – isn’t this just a subset of IoT’s promise? The answer is “yes” but that is how this revolution will work – closer to an evolution where the consumer-driven use cases will be implemented first. Yes, there are other enterprise use cases and we can see many protocols and frameworks that claim to address these requirements. In the end though, I believe most of these platforms will struggle with developer uptake as most of the developer mindshare is found in the big mobile ecosystems. As with mobile, the successful approaches will be the platforms that can offer developers familiar tools and a roadmap to revenue.

It’s clear the big players in mobile, like Samsung and Apple, see a huge opportunity in connected devices. As we move on, we will see more devices get included in each of the mobile ecosystems’ spheres. Increased integration between mobile devices and cars is already in the works. Similarly, among the many notable events at last week’s Samsung DevCon (an excellent show, by the way), several SDKs were launched with the aim of solving specific consumer needs around media consumption in the home. But the impact of increasing connectivity will go beyond these relatively well-understood use cases to encompass home automation, smart grid, healthcare and much more.

Alternative Authentication Methods for the Connected World
In this multi-device, multi-service world, conventional username/password login methods will not be convenient. Advances in the biometric space (such as Nymi or Apple Touch ID) will be relevant here. I suspect that, just as we have seen a bring-your-own-device trend grow in enterprise mobile, we will see a bring-your-own-authentication paradigm develop. As a larger set of authentication methods develops in the consumer space, enterprise IT systems will need to support these methods and often be required to adopt a multi-layered approach.

Ensuring Big Data Privacy in the Age of IoT
Another set of challenges will be created by the enormous amounts of data generated by IoT. Increasingly, connected devices are able to collect and transmit contextual data on users. This information can be highly useful for vendors and users alike. But what happens if data is used for purposes other than those first intended or agreed to? Who owns the raw data and the generated insights? And how is the rightful owner in control of this? Today, there is no general standard available nor are the mobile ecosystems providing adequate privacy protection. Sometimes one gets the feeling that users don’t care but they will probably start caring if and when data leakage starts to make an impact on their wallets.

Meanwhile, Layer 7 will continue to innovate and work on solutions that address the challenges created by IoT, multi-device authentication and Big Data. Oh and by the way, I believe Morgan Stanley underestimated the number, I think it will be double that. You heard it here first…

1 Comment »

  1. We published the translated article on CA Japan Security Blog site.
    http://caj-security.com/blog/?p=1870

    Comment by CA Japan — December 12, 2013 @ 9:46 pm

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