July 16th, 2014

The Maker Manifesto

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The Maker ManifestoOne of the few perks of having to travel for work is the opportunity to read books (remember those?), from cover to cover, in one go. I recently had the chance to read The Maker Manifesto by Mark Hatch, the CEO of TechShop. It is one of those rare books that make you want to jump up and start “making” something (which isn’t very practical when you happen to be on an airplane, I admit). But I will talk about this more in a minute.

I’ve been struggling lately with the overbearing Internet of Things (IoT) coverage and hype. All the ingenuity and potential seems to becoming increasingly directed towards creating yet another platform for advertising. Most if not all IoT presentations start out by citing the same one or two studies talking about billions of devices and trillions of dollars just beyond the horizon (I call it the x+1 syndrome – it is always one year out). This is usually followed by promises about how this or that gadget/protocol/framework/alliance is going to liberate us from our earthly burdens like switching off lights or turning on the coffee maker.

Of course, everything is open to debate but I personally prefer my simple wall-mounted light switch over having to pull out my smart phone and tap on an app.

In these challenging moments it is refreshing to remind myself what has drawn my interest to IoT in the first place. For me, the Internet of Things is simply a term describing a much deeper and more fundamental shift in society. And this shift – or rather the anticipation of this shift – is being called the “Internet of Things” in IT circles, the “Industrial Internet” by GE and the “Fourth Industrial Revolution” (aka “Industry 4.0”) in Germany. Meanwhile, The Economist and the previously-mentioned maker movement have been throwing around the term “artisan entrepreneur”.

The common theme across all of these manifestations is that technology is democratizing the way things are made. Maker-centric technologies like 3D printing could vastly increase the number of people who have direct access to the manufacturing process – which could be truly revolutionary.

To catch a glimpse of the future, look no further than Etsy, which has made a billion-dollar-plus business from selling individually-made crafts. And for what it’s worth, Etsy’s engineering blog is one of the finest – I love their mantra “Code as Craft”.

This brings me back to The Maker Manifesto. While Mark Hatch is coming at it from a maker perspective, someone could (and maybe should) have written a very similar book from a software perspective. Cloud IT, HTML5, Javascript, Node.js, Raspberry Pi, Arduino, GitHub – these are the tools for the coming “software maker” revolution. Both books would meet where our ability to create, to make is only limited by our imagination – and where individuals will be able to provide viable alternatives to industrial-scale production. It is my conviction that the Internet of Things describes the “place” where both software and hardware makers will meet. Having skills in both areas will become key to unlocking IoT’s potential.

It’s worth noting here that Hatch points to an emerging type of company that is built on software but reliant on a physical delivery platform. This is particularly prominent in the “sharing economy” created by companies like Uber, Airbnb and Getaround. It is a demonstration of how combining software with physical things like spare rooms and idle cars can be hugely disruptive to the way real-world products and services are delivered.

You might wonder where APIs are in all this. Well, just as cloud computing commoditized access to compute and storage resources, APIs are democratizing access to all manner of data and application functionality. Organizations across the private and public sectors are using APIs to open their information assets for use by external developers. In turn, these developers are creating apps that make previously siloed corporate information assets available to a vast number and variety of people.

As new hardware and software technologies combine with IoT and the good-old-fashioned physical world, APIs will be the glue that holds everything together. And – of course – API Management technology will be there to make sure it all happens securely and efficiently.

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