November 13th, 2013

QCon San Francisco 2013

QCon 2013This Thursday, I’ll be at QCon San Francisco to lead the RESTful Web APIs tutorial. This will be the second time QCon has hosted the full-day workshop and I’m very much looking forward to it. Most of the material I’ve prepared for this workshop is based on the book of the same name by Leonard Richardson and myself. That book was released in September of this year and we’ve been getting very positive feedback on it.

Participants in the workshop will learn how to design a hypermedia type, how to implement servers that safely and consistently expose business functionality using hypermedia and how to build client applications that understand the hypermedia messages and can interact with servers to create enjoyable user experiences.

Along the way several key principles will be explored, including:

  • Why a hypermedia-based message model is better than a code-based object model
  • How Web servers can expose operations as stateless resources instead of as function calls
  • How client applications can recognize and use hypermedia workflow to create quality user experiences
  • Why the hypermedia approach makes it easier to make small changes on the server without breaking existing client applications

The full-day session will also cover important technical aspects of implementing distributed applications over the Web. We will focus on identifying and managing the boundaries between services in order to increase both security and stability over the lifetime of the service. Attendees will get a chance to use existing services as a guide when creating their own and will even get a chance to introduce changes on the backend to see how their client applications can adapt and continue to function.

I always enjoy these extended workshops because it gives everyone (even myself) a chance to write real-life code for real-life services. I spend quite a bit of my time lecturing and advocating for increased reliance on adaptable distributed systems and it’s a rewarding experience. However, it’s also very energizing to work with people in a hands-on atmosphere where everyone is focused on getting things up and running in a working environment.

Of course, there will be lots of fun in the day, too. We have trivia breaks, I offer some handy prizes and we have plenty of time to relax and get to know each other. Overall, these full-day, hands-on workshops represent one of my favorite ways to spend a day with smart, talented people. And I’m grateful to the folks at QCon who make it all possible.

So, if you’re in San Francisco this Thursday and don’t have anything pressing to do, come on over to QCon and join us. Bring your laptop loaded with your favorite Web coding tools and your thinking cap. We’ve got a place all ready for you.

November 7th, 2013

The Software-Defined Telco

Software Defined TelcoBack in 2011, Marc Andreessen famously stated that “software is eating the world” and predicted that – over the subsequent decade – almost every major industry would be disrupted and transformed by software and the innovations of Silicon Valley. Just over two years later, it’s pretty clear he was right on the money. In order to remain relevant, many industrial behemoths need to transform themselves and they are looking at the software revolution as a way to enable a fresh wave of innovation and development.

This revolution has never been more important to the telco world, where it must start at the very core of the organization. Every layer – from network, to infrastructure, to application – should be considered a service enabler, be defined in software and be driven by APIs. A new wave of thought leadership and investment around “network functions virtualization” (NFV) is acting as a catalyst for this transformation and telcos can finally start to eschew the limitations of legacy networks and allow operators to more easily keep pace with Silicon Valley.

Finally then, APIs and API platforms can regain their intended utility in the telecommunications sector, emerging from a meandering journey through failed open developer ecosystems and misguided monetization strategies. APIs are meant to be at the very core of product development, they are supposed to be the foundation of a product or service and not tacked on the side afterwards. APIs enable an architectural paradigm that is essential to the software-defined network and they provide a scalable, documented and secure way of integrating systems and clients.

Layer 7 will be presenting a vision for the future of APIs in the software-defined telco at the Telecom APIs event in London (Nov 11 – 13) and the Telecom Application Developer Summit in Bangkok (Nov 21 – 22).

October 2nd, 2013

How APIs Grease the Data Wheels

Data MonetizationThis week, I’ve been attending and speaking at Data 2.0 in San Francisco, which is part of the API World Conference & Expo. Plainly, there is a connection between data and APIs.

As an API vendor, I would dearly like to believe the universe is embracing the API; giving it the proverbial uplifted thumb. And there’s no reason to think data doesn’t similarly “like” the API. APIs unlock value by making information available to both developers and applications – and there is plenty of value in data. Unlocking the value of data benefits everyone, especially the new data barons who own, aggregate or analyze the data. If data is the new oil, APIs are the pipelines and tankers (I guess making Hadoop the refiner).

But exposing data via APIs is not the full extent of the connection between data and APIs. The data landscape is getting reshaped by new found capabilities to store, mash, analyze and consume data. APIs provide the pathways for moving the data. But that leaves open the question of who regulates the pathways and the flow of data.

API delivery and management platforms like Layer 7′s represent one option for regulating the pathways and – if I may be so bold – perhaps the right way when data spans the Internet. If data sources, processors and destinations are distributed across the far-flung clouds, devices and apps that make-up the Internet, APIs provide the best way to interconnect the various data stores and actors. But then API delivery and management platforms are needed to govern that data flow.

API delivery and management platforms can simplify the ingestion of data from diverse stores spread out across the Internet. They can scrub, normalize and sanitize the data sets. They can simplify routing and federation across analysis and visualization tools. They can make data more consumable for developers, mobile apps, cloud services and even devices. And in the case of products like Layer 7, they can do this in a way that preserves privacy, integrity and general security.

Enterprises want to unlock value from their data oil. APIs provide the channels for getting the oil to the place where it can make the most difference. API delivery and management platforms ensure that the flow of data is both secure and managed – and always the right fit. As I described in my Data 2.0 talk earlier today, API delivery and management platforms can make the difference between being a data wildcatter and data baron.

September 30th, 2013

Workshops, Workshops, Workshops!

Layer 7 API WorkshopsOne of the great things about my job is that I get to travel around the world sharing API design strategies, experiences and theories with people who are at the forefront of our industry. These interactions not only make it easier to design effective APIs, they also have the potential to spark ideas that can lead to real business transformation.

But we aren’t all lucky enough to get these types of opportunities and it’s often difficult to justify the cost of traveling to far-flung events in the modern business world. If you’re in that boat, then it’s your lucky day: our Layer 7 API Strategy Workshop series aims to bring all the experiences, discussions and networking opportunities practically to your doorstep.

Over the next two months, Mike Amundsen, Holger Reinhardt and I will be delivering a series of free workshops on API strategy, the principles of good API design and the keys to designing an API that will last. In addition to core aspects of effective API design, we will discuss the emerging trends of developer experience (DX), the Internet of Things (IoT) and DevOps as they pertain to the API universe.

Our tour kicked off in September with great events in San Antonio and Los Angeles and it will continue through October and November with the following stops:

It’s going to be an exhausting couple of months for us but we’re looking forward to having some great conversations with our attendees. So, come out and join us during what promises to be a very thought-provoking and engaging series of half-day events.

September 13th, 2013

Nordic APIs

Nordic APIsIt looks like the remainder of September will provide a bounty of learning opportunities for those of you interested in diving deeper into API design.  To start with, Mike Amundsen and I will be continuing our Layer 7 API Academy workshop tour in Montreal and Calgary. In addition to our API Academy events, Mike will be hosting his annual conference related to all things REST with RESTFest 2013. I had the pleasure of attending last year and I highly recommend going if you are interested in thought-provoking conversation and ideas in the hypermedia domain.

On the other side of the ocean and closer to home for me is next week’s Nordic APIs conference in Stockholm (September 18-19).  I’ve been to a few of the smaller API design conferences that the Nordic APIs team has put on and I can say without a doubt that this will be a conference worth attending.  They’ve always done a great job of putting together sessions that will appeal to developers on the leading edge of API design as well as those who are looking for practical solutions.

I’ll be delivering a keynote presentation on a developer experience (DX) oriented design approach for APIs. My colleague Holger Reinhardt will be talking about the Internet of Things and Aran White will be delivering a demonstration of the Layer 7 product line. Of course, the great value in events like this comes from the serendipitous conversations that take place outside the agenda and Holger, Aran and I are really looking forward to swapping war stories with Nordic API attendees.

While I’m sad that I won’t be able to join Mike at RESTFest this year, I’m overjoyed at the reason I can’t go. I’m continually amazed at how much the European API design community has grown and watching the Nordic event grow from a few small events into a major conference has been eye opening. Not too long ago, it was difficult to find API design events to attend but now we are spoiled for choice. It’s a great indication of the continued interest in and growth of Web-based APIs.