June 6th, 2014

APIs Fueling the Connected Car Opportunity

APIs Fueling the Connected Car OpportunityI just attended the Telematics Detroit 2014 conference, which was abuzz with mobile connectivity sessions and workshops. But the mobile conversation at this event was entirely in the context of the connected car, as opposed to the mobile phone.

The connected car has emerged as a real-world illustration of the opportunities presented to businesses and consumers by the Internet of Things (IoT). And – as you probably know – IoT is a hot topic right now.

Thilo Koslowski, Vice President & Distinguished Analyst at Gartner, who is known for his prediction making, claimed the car will be the most innovative and exciting mobile platform over the next 10-to-15 years. A bold statement but this goal is achievable and very much within reach.

The automobile industry has already made great strides and is quickly leveraging the business advantages offered by the digital economy. What once was considered to be a telematics and roadside assistance market has quickly transformed into fertile ground for mobile app development, with broad connectivity opportunities that will enhance the consumer’s overall digital lifestyle while delivering auto manufacturer efficiencies throughout the entire value chain.

While consumers continue to demand somewhat standard connectivity features such as navigation, maps and parking location services, there’s also a significant demand for advanced connectivity features such as the ability to make payments directly from the vehicle, remotely start the car or receive diagnostic information on a mobile device. There is also a willingness to share data with third parties, especially if this results in a better driving experience or cost savings.

But data sharing has privacy implications in this context, which could become a significant roadblock. A Gartner survey of automobile consumers uncovered that 61% respondents would not opt-in if too much information was taken. So, enabling this new world of connectivity in auto requires a balanced approach. Consumers want the convenience and personalized experience that connectivity offers but only if it doesn’t impact their rights and freedoms.

That’s where a proper API strategy makes a difference. APIs will become fundamental to any connected car strategy by enabling an ecosystem of drivers, vehicles and partners to share data in a way that will improve the consumer experience through better digital design, engagement and security.

To learn more, please read our new eBook: APIs Fueling the Connected Car Opportunity. This document outlines a number of key connected car use cases and explains how the proper API security and management solution will enable you to meet your connected car business and security objectives.

May 27th, 2014

Hybrid App Growth in the Enterprise: Lessons Learned at Gartner AADI

Gartner AADI 2014Last week, I was lucky enough to attend the latest Gartner Application Architecture, Development & Integration Summit in London. One of the key themes that emerged from this show was the need to create agile architectures for mobile apps that leverage enterprises’ backed systems. Architectural agility has long been a central concern for enterprise IT but it has taken on a new urgency with the mobile revolution. As all sorts of enterprises scramble to launch effective mobile app strategies, the issue of how to build agile architectures for the mobile domain is ever more pressing.

One of the key questions for architects charged with enabling enterprise app strategies is whether enterprises should be developing fully native mobile apps, building apps on Web standards like HTML5 or taking a hybrid approach. Based on the sessions I attended and my conversations with architects who are attempting to answer this question in the field, it is clear that each approach has its own advantages and pitfalls. The Web-centric approach enables enterprises to be quick-to-market – a significance advantage in the current climate. But HTML5 simply cannot deliver the kind of rich and seamless functionality offered by native apps.

Logically then, the hybrid approach would seem like the way to go. But even this has its disadvantages. For example, platform vendors like Apple and Google might impose more restrictive terms and conditions on hybrids. Furthermore, hybrid apps retain many of the disadvantages of a Web-centric approach. Hybrids can never deliver the full native experience users prefer and they create significant testing and security challenges. And it’s quite possible that, at some point in the future, mobile development tools could improve to the point where hybrids are no quicker or cheaper to deploy than native apps.

Nevertheless, hybrid apps have significant advantages. First and foremost, the hybrid approach turns the whole “Web-versus-native” binary into a continuum, allowing sophisticated trade-offs to be made between cost/time-to-market and functionality. Furthermore: tools to create hybrid apps are well understood and widely available; unlike pure HTML5 apps, hybrids allow a presence in the app store for marketing purposes; hybrids allow some content and features to be updated without resubmitting the app to the store.

In light of all this, it seems clear to me that the hybrid approach will have a role to play in the ongoing development of enterprise mobility. Indeed, if I remember correctly, one study I heard mentioned said that, by 2016, over half of all mobile apps deployed will be hybrids – whereas less than a quarter were just a year ago. Still, hybrid apps won’t work for every use case and my advice to architects would be to make sure your architectural approach matches the needs and resources of your organization. And whatever approach you take, make sure that it is built on a technology platform that will allow the apps to run smoothly at scale, without impacting the security or performance of backend systems.

May 9th, 2014

Trade Shows, Connected Cars & Secure APIs

API Events May-June 2014May and June are shaping up to be busy months here at Layer 7! We will be sponsoring and exhibiting at a number of leading industry events and our API Management experts will be speaking at several of these shows.

Notably, throughout the month of June, our speakers will be focusing on the “connected car” – a prominent Internet of Things use case. Below, I’ve provided a list of some upcoming shows that will have a Layer 7 presence. If you’re attending any of these events, take the opportunity to learn how secure APIs will be vital to enabling automotive connectivity. And be sure to stop by the Layer 7 booth to say “hi”!

For full details of our upcoming events, visit the Layer 7 Web site. And if you’d like to schedule a meeting with one of our experts at any of these shows, please reach out to us by emailing events@layer7.com.

Layer 7 events in May/June 2014:

April 17th, 2014

Next API Tech Talk: Linked APIs

Linked APIsThe challenges faced by today’s software architects go far beyond the familiar. “Big Data” means more than managing petabytes of data – it requires dealing with data-sets that span organizational boundaries. Likewise, the term “distributed system” no longer refers to just a multi-tier architecture or cloud deployment – it usually involves the connection of non-heterogeneous systems across multiple organizations.

On Thursday April 24, I’ll discuss these challenges as part of Layer 7’s latest API Tech Talk. I’ll be using this opportunity to explore how architects can leverage “linked APIs” to handle Big Data sets and distributed systems that cross organizational, technological and cultural boundaries, breaking through data silos in order to better integrate information. Interested? Just add the Tech Talk to your calendar and go to api.co/L7live at 9am PDT (12pm EDT) next Thursday.

I’ll also be taking your questions on linked APIs, Big Data, distributed systems, open source and anything related, so please don’t hesitate to join in. You can submit your questions now by email or you can chat with me or tweet them at me on the day. This will be my first Tech Talk since joining the Layer 7 API Academy and I’m really, really looking forward to a lively discussion. See you on April 24!

April 10th, 2014

Upcoming Talks at MobileWeek 2014 in NYC

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MobileWeek 2014I will be attending MobileWeek 2014 in New York City next Monday, April 13. I’ll be at the conference all day, so drop by and say hello. Part way through the day, I’ll  deliver a two-minute lightning talk on mobile authentication, followed by a panel on enterprise mobile security and scalability.

The lightning talk is at 12:25 pm:

How to Make Mobile Authentication Dead Easy
Are your developers struggling to integrate mobile apps and enterprise data? They shouldn’t be! In just two minutes, learn the easiest way to get end-to-end security between your mobile apps and the enterprise — all without using a VPN.

It must be easy if I can cover it in only two minutes!

The panel, scheduled to start at 1:10pm (an odd time, so keep an eye on the clock), will include participants from Hightail and will be moderated by Geoff Domoracki, who is one of the conference founders:

The Mobile Enterprise: Productivity, Security & Scalability
We hear terms like “mobile enterprise” and “mobile workforce” but how far are we towards creating an enterprise work environment that enables real-time communication beyond geographic boundaries — freeing the employee to work from his phone anywhere in the world? This panel will explore the opportunities and challenges around the emergence of a “mobile enterprise” where sitting at a desk in the office is becoming more and more outdated. How do you share documents, secure data, prove identity and geo-collaborate in the new mobile enterprise?

Overall it looks to be a good day. New York is a hotbed of mobile development and I’m looking forward to meeting lots of interesting people.

See you at MobileWeek!