January 30th, 2014

API Academy Summits

API Academy SummitsLast year, Mike Amundsen, Holger Reinhardt and I each traipsed around the world to bring API architecture guidance and advice to your home towns.  It was a lot of fun, we got to meet some great people and we had a chance to learn about the challenges that front-line API designers face. We also managed to earn a lot of air miles and give away a lot of t-shirts.

But this year, we wanted to top ourselves and do something bigger and bolder. So, instead of going out individually, Mike, Holger and I are getting together to dish out practical API design advice together in a series of API Academy Summits. I’m really excited about these events because we’ll have a chance to provide differing points of view and draw on our collective expertise to give you the best guidance possible. Our goal this year is to continue to go beyond the inspirational hype about why your business needs an API and go deeper, addressing the real challenges that people who actually have to implement API programs face in the real world.

In addition to the API Academy team, we are extremely pleased to have Forrester Research analyst Randy Heffner providing a keynote presentation. Randy has been a great source of API design information over the last year and if you’ve been reading his work, you’ll know he is all about providing great practical advice to API designers.

Our first Summit is taking place in London on February 6, closely followed by an event in New York city on February 13. These full-day events will include real API implementation stories from William Hill and L’Oreal as well as providing a mobile developer’s view of API design, courtesy of local London developer Niall Roche.

Last year, we were surprised to hear from API Academy workshop attendees that they wanted us to talk about Layer 7′s products. We want these to be vendor-neutral events but we’ve listened to the feedback and are trialing a short session introducing the Layer 7 API Gateway and Portal.  This session will be held at the end of the day and we promise not to lock the doors and force you to listen to the pitch!

So, if you have a chance to be in London on February 6 or New York on February 13, make sure you find time to join us for one of our API Academy Summits!

December 10th, 2013

Layer 7 at Gartner AADI Las Vegas 2013

Gartner AADI 2013Last week, I attended the Gartner Application Architecture, Development & Integration Summit in Las Vegas for the third consecutive year. Aside from the cool alumni sticker on my attendee badge, returning annually to this conference also provides a really interesting touch-point with a familiar cross-section of potential (and existing) customers.

In past years, talking to other attendees during exhibit hours involved some amount of basic education around the value of APIs to enterprises, potential use cases and the need for security and management of those APIs. This year was a totally different experience, as there was no education necessary. Instead, I found these decision makers already informed – eager to implement or continue implementing their API strategies in order to achieve real-world mandates from their management and lines of business.

They told me about mobile initiatives requiring apps developed for customers, partners and/or employees; they talked about modernization of legacy infrastructure and a deeper embrace of hybrid cloud; they recognized the need for developer enablement and a shift toward continuous deployment. Most importantly for us, they recognized that APIs are essential to the successful deployment of each of these initiatives.

In a world quickly moving toward “software-defined everything,” they also acknowledged the importance of API security and management. Instead of asking why they would need our solution, they asked for differentiators in the marketplace and our latest innovations. I was happy to talk with them about the recently-released version 2.0 of our Mobile Access Gateway, which enables developers to focus on creating the best apps possible while maintaining an unprecedented level of end-to-end security from the native app to the enterprise datacenter.

We also talked about: advanced features in the latest releases of our Gateway and API Portal products; our unparalleled capabilities in security and integration; our recognition from analysts as leaders and innovators in the industry. And we talked about the future – what new technologies are being considered and how they’re going to transform the enterprise even further.

As 2013 comes to a close, this year is beginning to look like a turning point. This may be remembered as the year enterprises embraced the API, leading to a broad range of innovative programs. We’ve seen massive consolidation and investment in our space, including our own acquisition. APIs have certainly joined the mainstream. Now it’s time to see what great things we can help our customers accomplish. I’m really looking forward to 2014!

November 13th, 2013

QCon San Francisco 2013

QCon 2013This Thursday, I’ll be at QCon San Francisco to lead the RESTful Web APIs tutorial. This will be the second time QCon has hosted the full-day workshop and I’m very much looking forward to it. Most of the material I’ve prepared for this workshop is based on the book of the same name by Leonard Richardson and myself. That book was released in September of this year and we’ve been getting very positive feedback on it.

Participants in the workshop will learn how to design a hypermedia type, how to implement servers that safely and consistently expose business functionality using hypermedia and how to build client applications that understand the hypermedia messages and can interact with servers to create enjoyable user experiences.

Along the way several key principles will be explored, including:

  • Why a hypermedia-based message model is better than a code-based object model
  • How Web servers can expose operations as stateless resources instead of as function calls
  • How client applications can recognize and use hypermedia workflow to create quality user experiences
  • Why the hypermedia approach makes it easier to make small changes on the server without breaking existing client applications

The full-day session will also cover important technical aspects of implementing distributed applications over the Web. We will focus on identifying and managing the boundaries between services in order to increase both security and stability over the lifetime of the service. Attendees will get a chance to use existing services as a guide when creating their own and will even get a chance to introduce changes on the backend to see how their client applications can adapt and continue to function.

I always enjoy these extended workshops because it gives everyone (even myself) a chance to write real-life code for real-life services. I spend quite a bit of my time lecturing and advocating for increased reliance on adaptable distributed systems and it’s a rewarding experience. However, it’s also very energizing to work with people in a hands-on atmosphere where everyone is focused on getting things up and running in a working environment.

Of course, there will be lots of fun in the day, too. We have trivia breaks, I offer some handy prizes and we have plenty of time to relax and get to know each other. Overall, these full-day, hands-on workshops represent one of my favorite ways to spend a day with smart, talented people. And I’m grateful to the folks at QCon who make it all possible.

So, if you’re in San Francisco this Thursday and don’t have anything pressing to do, come on over to QCon and join us. Bring your laptop loaded with your favorite Web coding tools and your thinking cap. We’ve got a place all ready for you.

November 7th, 2013

The Software-Defined Telco

Software Defined TelcoBack in 2011, Marc Andreessen famously stated that “software is eating the world” and predicted that – over the subsequent decade – almost every major industry would be disrupted and transformed by software and the innovations of Silicon Valley. Just over two years later, it’s pretty clear he was right on the money. In order to remain relevant, many industrial behemoths need to transform themselves and they are looking at the software revolution as a way to enable a fresh wave of innovation and development.

This revolution has never been more important to the telco world, where it must start at the very core of the organization. Every layer – from network, to infrastructure, to application – should be considered a service enabler, be defined in software and be driven by APIs. A new wave of thought leadership and investment around “network functions virtualization” (NFV) is acting as a catalyst for this transformation and telcos can finally start to eschew the limitations of legacy networks and allow operators to more easily keep pace with Silicon Valley.

Finally then, APIs and API platforms can regain their intended utility in the telecommunications sector, emerging from a meandering journey through failed open developer ecosystems and misguided monetization strategies. APIs are meant to be at the very core of product development, they are supposed to be the foundation of a product or service and not tacked on the side afterwards. APIs enable an architectural paradigm that is essential to the software-defined network and they provide a scalable, documented and secure way of integrating systems and clients.

Layer 7 will be presenting a vision for the future of APIs in the software-defined telco at the Telecom APIs event in London (Nov 11 – 13) and the Telecom Application Developer Summit in Bangkok (Nov 21 – 22).

October 2nd, 2013

How APIs Grease the Data Wheels

Data MonetizationThis week, I’ve been attending and speaking at Data 2.0 in San Francisco, which is part of the API World Conference & Expo. Plainly, there is a connection between data and APIs.

As an API vendor, I would dearly like to believe the universe is embracing the API; giving it the proverbial uplifted thumb. And there’s no reason to think data doesn’t similarly “like” the API. APIs unlock value by making information available to both developers and applications – and there is plenty of value in data. Unlocking the value of data benefits everyone, especially the new data barons who own, aggregate or analyze the data. If data is the new oil, APIs are the pipelines and tankers (I guess making Hadoop the refiner).

But exposing data via APIs is not the full extent of the connection between data and APIs. The data landscape is getting reshaped by new found capabilities to store, mash, analyze and consume data. APIs provide the pathways for moving the data. But that leaves open the question of who regulates the pathways and the flow of data.

API delivery and management platforms like Layer 7′s represent one option for regulating the pathways and – if I may be so bold – perhaps the right way when data spans the Internet. If data sources, processors and destinations are distributed across the far-flung clouds, devices and apps that make-up the Internet, APIs provide the best way to interconnect the various data stores and actors. But then API delivery and management platforms are needed to govern that data flow.

API delivery and management platforms can simplify the ingestion of data from diverse stores spread out across the Internet. They can scrub, normalize and sanitize the data sets. They can simplify routing and federation across analysis and visualization tools. They can make data more consumable for developers, mobile apps, cloud services and even devices. And in the case of products like Layer 7, they can do this in a way that preserves privacy, integrity and general security.

Enterprises want to unlock value from their data oil. APIs provide the channels for getting the oil to the place where it can make the most difference. API delivery and management platforms ensure that the flow of data is both secure and managed – and always the right fit. As I described in my Data 2.0 talk earlier today, API delivery and management platforms can make the difference between being a data wildcatter and data baron.