August 13th, 2013

What ist DaaS?

DaaSWe live in the age of Big Data but Big Data is not showing up to the party alone. Fast data and open data are also coming along for the ride. This is why we need an “as-a-service” approach to data sharing. In a recent article for Big Data Republic, I explored the concept of data-as-a-service (DaaS) and some of the operational challenges associated with providing access to Big Data.

The fact that these challenges are not just theoretical considerations was driven home to me by one of our customers, who told me that he simply didn’t have enough IT cycles to keep writing and rewriting all those queries and APIs his customers were asking for.

Similarly another recent article on Big Data Republic, refered to three powerful drivers for machine learning identified by Tibco CTO Matt Quinn – drivers that I believe are equally relevant to data APIs:

  • “A surge of data being liberated from places where it was previously hidden (aka big data’s volume challenge)
  • A need for automation that manages the complexity of Big Data in an environment where humans have no time to intervene (aka Big Data’s velocity challenge)
  • An absolute requirement to create adaptable, less fragile systems that can manage the combination of structured and unstructured data without having a human write complex code and rules with each change (aka Big Data’s variety challenge)”

The efficiency gains and resulting agility and potential for innovation created by data-centric APIs are enormous – not just in respect to open data but also the ability to turn data into an active asset and monetize it. For an inspiring story, head over to Andorra via FastCompany.

Meanwhile, an interesting take on the way IoT is increasingly driving data democratization – and creating new governance challenges in the process – comes from  Christopher J. Rezendes and W. David Stephenson in an article at the HBR blog network. Naturally, the best place to implement and enforce data governance is in the API that provides access to the data.

Secure API design and management is not rocket science. Our API Academy is offering best practices and practical advice on everything from API design to API security to API lifecyle management (and yes, that includes versioning). And if you are curious about how Layer7′s API Management Suite can help your Big Data access challenge, download our Data Lens solution brief or contact me at hreinhardt@layer7.com.

June 6th, 2013

It’s Official… Layer 7 Joins CA Technologies

Layer 7 and CAThis week, CA Technologies officially closed its acquisition of Layer 7. As a Layer 7 co-founder, this represents the culmination of a decade’s worth of hard work. Equally important, it represents the opening of a new chapter for the company and an opportunity to amplify the vision we have been promoting.

Since our founding, we have preached the vision that enterprises can open their data and application assets programmatically in a secure way. When we started off, the primary driver for opening up was tighter business integration with partners. Today however, the demand for opening up data and application assets has exploded alongside the growth of mobile, cloud, Big Data and the Internet of Things (IoT).

The idea of organizations as walled-off castles is gone. Mobile is forcing organizations to deliver new business apps to customers and employees beyond the enterprise perimeter. Cloud is redefining how applications are consumed and delivered across a hybridized, extended organization. IoT will upend our notions of outside connectivity and data processing. APIs play a central role in making all this happen. Layer 7 gives customers the confidence to open up via APIs, without compromising security or operational integrity.

For us at Layer 7, security has always been a paramount consideration because our customers are enterprises and enterprises care about security. The CA Technologies acquisition reflects a common point of view on how to deliver new business value in mobility, cloud etc. while protecting the data and applications that are the lifeblood of a today’s enterprise.

CA and Layer 7 both appreciate that the old enterprise security perimeter is disappearing and that the only way to effectively enable online business while protecting information assets is to make identity the new perimeter. We need to focus on managing who gets access to what and what they can do with data once they have that access. Put another way, we need to focus on the identity, data and access that drives modern initiatives around Web, mobile, cloud, social and IoT. Together CA Technologies and Layer 7 Technologies offer enterprises the first truly multi-channel approach to enabling the business while securing its information assets.

Looking into the future, one clearly sees the scope for APIs will increase. IoT will make every formerly detached device connected – all through APIs. Where networking used to be about discrete routers and switches, it is now being transformed, via SDN, into something that is programmable and agile – again, this will be brought to you by APIs. And as for the server and storage infrastructure that underpins the data that drives the Web and mobile, Amazon Web Services has given us a glimpse of the future. As the “Web Services” part of that name suggests, APIs will play a significant role in provisioning in management of the cloud.

As we join CA Technologies, we now have the necessary reach and breadth to make Layer 7 the unassailable leader in the API security and management space. For customers, this means more of what they liked plus the ability to accelerate delivery of our original vision. We’re here to help organizations open up via APIs. And we’re open for business.

March 22nd, 2013

Enterprise Mobility & BYOD – Live Interactive Q&A

BYOD Tech TalkCalling all Enterprise Architects, Application Architects and Senior Developers! For our next API Tech Talk, we’ll be discussing Enterprise Mobility & BYOD live on March 26 at 9am PST. My special guests will be Layer 7 VP of Client Services Matt McLarty and Product Manager for Mobile Leif Bildoy.

The BYOD movement seems to be changing the hardware landscape permanently and it’s showing no signs of slowing down. Naturally, this presents both opportunities and challenges. Security managers within the enterprise have less control then ever. “Anywhere access” has blurred the lines of what used to be called the corporate network perimeter.

So what are CIOs and CTOs specifically worried about with BYOD? Well for one, mobile devices can easily go missing while containing sensitive data and employers often cannot even assess the impact of data security breaches from compromised devices. But locking down employees’ personal devices is generally not an option.

So how can enterprises re-assert control over their data assets while still allowing employees to use their own smartphones as they choose? We’ll be discussing this and other questions during out live, interactive Q&A. So, be sure to clear your calendar and join in the discussion on March 26 at 9am PST.

Here’s How to Join the Discussion
Make sure you click Add to Calendar to get the event details and a reminder in your calendar. Then, on the day of the event, click here to join:

To ask questions, you can:

January 25th, 2013

Considerations for Private APIs

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Considerations for Private APIsIn the past, we’ve talked about the nature of private APIs (those interfaces that are built primarily to serve an organization’s own projects rather than to fulfill the needs of others).  But what are the specific challenges and architectural decisions that need to be made when implementing a private API?

First and foremost, an API can’t be considered private if it is open for widespread public use, right?  A simple way of keeping an API private is to host the interface on a public network without explicitly advertising or documenting its existence.  This can work well initially but may lead to problems in the future. If your service is valuable enough that others want to get their hands on it, even an undocumented, unsupported, private API can easily end up becoming a depended-upon API for application developers, resulting in an outcry when the API publisher has the audacity to modify or retire its own service.

A better approach is to provide access control at run-time and restrict usage of your API to a few known parties. There are a great number of methods for protecting access to internal resources but the best ones are those that achieve a balance between ease of implementation and resistance to infiltration. Security at all costs can greatly increase the complexity of an interface and – in turn – the time required to complete the projects that depend on it. Instead, we need to implement access control that is practical. Thankfully, security protocols like SSL, HTTP Basic authentication and OAuth 2 are great for providing the basic level of access control needed to make it difficult for outsiders to use a private API. Bear in mind that there is much more to API security than simply validating identity but this is the minimum level needed to ensure a degree of privacy.

Although a private API’s developers are generally known to the publisher, the best private APIs utilize API portal components to provide self-service registrations and integration to their private developer communities. This can greatly reduce the friction involved in getting API integration-based projects started and reduce the overall project costs for B2B and mobile-based initiatives. In fact, many of the lessons of simplified design, documentation and administration learned from the public API world can be directly applied to private API management. While the ultimate goal may be different (driving efficient API usage for private APIs rather than far-reaching adoption of open APIs), the ways of getting there are largely the same.

A unique characteristic of private APIs is the need to manage groups of developers. Unlike the public API space, private API publishers will often define out of band contract terms before offering up a quick self-service integration mechanism for that team. This type of group-based role definition is particularly common in integration projects that occur between organizations and can stretch the limits of API portal software that has been built primarily for open API use. Ideally, an API portal should at least be capable of managing developers within groups, communities or organizational affiliations as part of the self-service registration process. Even better, the portal could  provide capabilities for managing whole communities as separate domains within the same infrastructure.

Designing a private API certainly requires a different perspective but the good news is that much of the knowledge around public API design can be directly applied to interfaces you want to keep secret. Of course, building the management and security capabilities required to expose the API to your trusted parties can be daunting but that is why a great API management portal and gateway combination can save the day.

 

September 17th, 2012

Web APIs are International

APIs are GlobalI had the great fortune of spending last week in India, helping a Layer 7 customer develop a Web API program from scratch. While it’s always exciting to walk into a greenfield situation and build something new, I was doubly excited to be doing this in India, where the concept of open APIs is still fairly new.

Over the last few years, we’ve seen explosive growth in open APIs across North America, lead of course by the avant garde Internet companies on the West Coast. The API Management industry has focused much of its attention on the US market but the Web API movement has definitely made its way to other markets and the push towards mobile and device-based applications is clearly having an influence on enterprise architectures.

Western Europe has had a strong influence on the API scene, with notable government and enterprise organizations diving wholeheartedly into the collaborative, developer-focused open API space. London, in particular, has developed a thriving technology scene with tons of hackathons, codeathons, meetups and start-up companies trying to change the world or at least get rich trying.

At the moment, the open API scene in India is still in its infancy and I’m looking forward to helping the concept blossom in whatever way that I can. As you may be aware, the number of mobile devices being used in India is mind-boggling and the ratio of mobile-use-to-desktop-computing is much higher than in North America or Western Europe.  This quantity of mobile client platforms, combined with the large number of motivated developers on the scene, makes this a very intriguing open API marketplace. I can’t disclose any details on the nature of the project yet… but I’m hoping to to have exciting news to share in the near future, so stay tuned.

I’ve spent most of the summer in North America, for a variety of reasons and I’m excited that I will finally be getting back home to the UK so I can re-engage with the European API and mobile scene. We have some great Layer 7 API workshops scheduled across Europe over the next few months and hopefully we will uncover a few new and noteworthy European API publishers while we are on tour.