August 29th, 2014

360 Reasons to Attend API360 Summit in DC on Sept. 12

API360 SpeakersWe are two weeks away from the API360 Summit in Washington, DC. This event will examine the state of the industry in APIs, with a particular focus on the impact of open data and open APIs in the public sector.

We have a phenomenal lineup of participants, including:

  • Gray Brooks, who will describe the importance of APIs to the groundbreaking efforts of the federal government’s digital services delivery program, 18F
  • The API Evangelist himself, Kin Lane, who will moderate panels on open APIs and open data
  • Sanjay Motwani, who will tell the story of the API program at The Advisory Board Company, a leading healthcare research and consulting firm
  • Michael Prichard, Co-Founder & CTO at WillowTree Apps, who will give a client-side perspective on the importance of APIs and good API design

All the panelists are equally excellent and we hope to provide as many API perspectives as possible, while giving you – the attendee – the opportunity to interact and share your views in real time. We still have a few seats left and would love to see you there.

P.S. I would also like to let you know that our second API360 Summit will take place in London on November 18. Expect to see an announcement in mid-September.

August 21st, 2014

3 Philosophies for the IoT Age

IoT eBook“What on earth do pillars of science have to do with IoT?” That’s a question I’ve had to answer a few times since the publication of our latest CA Layer 7 eBook, 3 Philosophies for the IoT Age. At first glance, some people have been a little taken aback at the idea that we’re comparing the Internet of Things to the work of great theoretical physicists like Isaac Newton, Albert Einstein and Niels Bohr (the founding father of quantum mechanics). What’s the deal here?

Anyone who digs a bit deeper into the document will quickly realize that this comparison refers to IT architecture broadly, rather than IoT specifically and – crucially – that it’s not supposed to be taken too literally. It’s a metaphor, folks! And as a metaphor, I think it works rather well – with Newton representing traditional on-premise architecture, Einstein representing the vast expanse of the Web and Bohr representing the billions of little connections that make up IoT.

While I’m pretty pleased with these analogies, I can’t really claim responsibility for them. The original idea came from my API Academy colleague Mike Amundsen. I took Mike’s idea and ran with it during a talk I gave at APIdays in San Francisco then fleshed it out a bit in the eBook. The more I looked at it, the more connections I could see between IoT and Bohr’s view of a dense, chaotic molecular universe.

I also believe Mike’s physics metaphor has a practical application. IoT is becoming such a big deal that it’s pretty much guaranteed to generate a wealth of business opportunities. But business leaders and IT experts currently have little insight into what this will actually involve. It’s my hope that the eBook will provide a framework for these folks to start exploring what the opportunities are and what the technical requirements for realizing these opportunities will be.

So, if you’re beginning to think about what IoT will mean for your business, 3 Philosophies for the IoT Age might just help to set you off in the right direction.

July 17th, 2014

API360 Summit – Washington, DC

API360Since the API Academy was founded two years ago, we have had the pleasure of helping numerous organizations and industry leaders succeed with their API programs. Through this experience, we have learned at least as much as we have taught – and we recognize that continuing this collaboration is vital to furthering the field of API strategy and design. Also in this time, we have observed a growing recognition that a holistic approach to APIs is needed in order to achieve maximum benefit.

With all of this in mind, we are pleased to announce our API360 Summit series. These complimentary one-day summits will bring together industry leaders to examine APIs from every possible perspective: business and innovation; architecture and design; applications and trends. Most importantly, these events will provide attendees with up-to-date, actionable information they can start using as soon as they walk out the door at the end of the day.

Our first API360 Summit will take place on September 12 at the Newseum in Washington, DC. We will be featuring a range of speakers with first-hand experience of how APIs are impacting organizations across the public and private sectors. There will also be panel sessions examining pertinent topics like using APIs in open government and exposing APIs to external developers. And there will be plenty of opportunities for interaction and discussion.

For more information and free registration please visit the API360 site.

July 15th, 2014

Beyond the CMS

NPR BuildingOn April 22, 2011, I was in Washington, DC, preparing to start my new job at NPR. At that point in my life, this was pretty much my dream job, so I was very excited and a little nervous. I did a lot of thinking that night and the conclusions I came to eventually became the basis of NPR’s technology strategy. I recently had a chance to share my thoughts from that night as part of a talk at the Integrated Media Association’s iMA 2014 conference. Here are the edited highlights.

The basic premise I started from was that all content management systems are fundamentally broken. This may sound a little harsh but I feel able to say it because I’m part of the problem – I’ve built content management systems for organizations across the public and private sectors, so I’m pretty well placed to tell you that no available CMS platform is architected for what publishers – particularly news outlets – truly need.

Most content management systems were designed years ago, for a much simpler world. We now live in an incredibly fragmented and complex world. Any piece of content tends to be sourced from a variety of places and published across a range of old and new media channels. Throughout this complex process, everything has to work seamlessly. The margin for error during breaking news or major events is pretty much zero.

In this context, what do publishers actually need from a CMS? They need:

  • An easy way to connect with many news sources
  • The ability to push content across a variety of channels
  • Guaranteed availability and scalability

So, how do we build a CMS that actually addresses these needs? To my mind, the solution has three key components. First and foremost, the whole architectural approach must be based on APIs. Second, it must specifically use hypermedia APIs and finally, the APIs must be what I’ve been calling “linked APIs”.

1. APIs First
APIs represent the only universal way to connect anything on the Web to any other online thing. Unfortunately, since we started the Web in a desktop-centric world, APIs were an afterthought. Historically, we used to build a Web site and then maybe also add an API, as a window into our content.

This is the wrong approach. Your Web site is just one of the destinations for your content. Increasingly, it’s not even the most important one, since mobile viewership is clearly on the rise. Don’t treat your Web site as special. All your content and functionality should be put into and delivered through APIs.

 2. Hypermedia
Publishers need things to just work. They don’t care about the technical details; they just can’t have their services go down at any time – so, scalability is paramount. And how do you ensure scalability? As I’ve pointed out before, the most scalable network ever created is the World Wide Web and the secret to the Web’s scalability is hypermedia.

Hypermedia is any type of content that not only carries data but also links to other documents. The hypermedia type that is most fundamental to the Web – and certainly the one we are most familiar with – is HTML. However, HTML was designed for human-centric Web sites, not for exchanging structured content via APIs.

There are, however, other hypermedia types that were designed for this very purpose. As a matter of fact, I was involved in the creation of a very robust one called Collection.Document, which was designed specifically for media organizations.

3. Linked APIs
Leveraging hypermedia as an integral part of interface design allows us to create “linked APIs”. Most current APIs are, at best, creating narrow windows into the solid walls of data silos. Even the most high-profile API will typically only provide access to a single corporate database. Hypermedia allows us to create links between these databases.

This will prove essential to the next generation of content management systems because linked APIs have the potential to give content publishers the freedom they want to seamlessly integrate content from diverse sources and push it across the full spectrum of online channels. As such, they could even come to represent the engine that drives press freedom into the coming decades. So, let’s get that engine cranking!

June 26th, 2014

APIs in the Connected Car: APIdays San Francisco

APIdays SFToday, I’m going to share some rather opinionated thoughts about APIs and the connected car. My opinions on this subject sprang from a combination of real-world experience plus (informed) speculation and came together as I prepared a talk for APIdays San Francisco.

The connected car is widely recognized as a game changer for the automotive industry. Experts all agree that just selling cars is a thing of the past. Mobility, connectivity and in-car user-experience will be leading decision considerations for car sales. Right now, automotive manufacturers, content providers and app developers are all competing to take a leading role in the connected car space. This is a matter of survival. Winners of the competition will be richly rewarded; the losers may sink into oblivion.

Car manufacturers seem understandably determined to dominate the connected car space. But this space is inherently shared with device manufacturers, content providers and app developers. Take away any one participant and you no longer have a sustainable ecosystem. If the automotive sector is not prepared to work with and accommodate the needs of other stakeholders, then no one will win. There are three things the industry can do to make things significantly better right away.

1. Implement a Standard Hypermedia Type for Automotive APIs
Right now, every car manufacturer wants to do its own thing and sees originality as a key to differentiation. This is a fallacy. There are way too many car manufacturers for content providers and app developers to keep up with the variety. Some have suggested that all manufacturers should just deploy Android as the base OS. I personally doubt they will all be able to agree on something as fundamental as the core OS. We should shoot for something much more realistic.

This is where hypermedia comes in. The most distributed system ever built — the World Wide Web — uses a hypermedia type (HTML) as its engine. There is a great opportunity to create a hypermedia format for car APIs that will energize the space just like HTML did for the Web. I believe this format could be based on an existing, generic type such as: Uber, HAL or Siren. This would be similar to the way the Collection.Document type was created for the news media industry, based on Collection.json.

2. Adopt a Standard API Security & Identity System
The prospect of connected cars getting hacked creates enormous anxiety. But connected car security can be addressed quite simply by adopting a security framework based around compartmentalization and standards-based access control.

In this context, “compartmentalization” means that core functions of the vehicle should be highly guarded. Specifically, no third-party app should have access to core driving functions like handling and braking. Meanwhile, a standards-based access control framework like OAuth will provide secure, granular access to specific system features. This would be similar to the way mobile apps currently ask for access to other parts of the device (GPs, contacts etc.)

3. Enable App Developers
Currently, only the lucky few are able to develop apps for connected cars. Generally, these are app vendors that have formal partnerships with car manufacturers. In most cases, developers can’t even get access to API documentation without a group of lawyers signing stacks of papers. The connected car space will not develop if it remains a tightly-held, closed system. On the contrary, manufacturers must build developer communities by providing the things that developers require: documentation; self-service portals; sandboxes; SDKs etc.

But That’s Not All
These are three immediate steps that can be taken to improve the connected car space significantly but as the space develops, we will have to focus not only on immediate requirements but also on the big picture. The connected car is a special case of the Internet of Things (IoT). The context of IoT is different enough that it requires a fundamentally different approach to system design and architecture. Hopefully, I will be able to delve into this context more in future.

Another aspect of the big picture is a good deal simpler: fun. If this space is going to develop as it should, manufacturers will have to make it fun for developers to experiment with the potential of automotive connectivity.

So, have fun out there!