March 26th, 2014

Of Monsters & Men & Machines

Written by
Category API Security, IoT, M2M
 

Monsters Men Machines

In my last post, I talked about IoT and its nascent emergence into our everyday lives, with products like Anki Drive and the Nest Thermostat beginning to get a foothold. I also talked about the need for security, as IoT becomes more present in our day-to-day lives. Today, let’s talk about a few real-world examples where security was an “oh, we didn’t think of that” kinda thing.

Implantable medical devices (think pacemakers, for example) are absolute lifesavers for virtually all recipients. And, as you would suspect, they need to be monitored – usually at a doctor’s office. BUT what if the recipient lives in a rural area (e.g. anywhere in Montana, North/South Dakota, Wyoming)? A quick visit to the office might be out of the question. But there’s an app for that (you knew that was coming, right?) Pop an IP address and wireless on that pacemaker, plug that address into the doctors app and voila! Monitoring via the Internet! Yeah! Only thing is… suppose somebody got a hold of that IP address? And suppose that somebody had access to said app? Monitoring could easily become something far more nefarious – bumping up the heartbeat, slowing it down (either of which may have the same result, mind you). Not too cool.

Or how about using a baby monitor with video? New parents are always going to want to have complete unfettered access to their precious being – and the newest generation of baby monitors not only delivers audio but video and yes, with an IP address, there’s an app for that too! So mom/dad can be anywhere and keep complete tabs on the fruit of their loins. Of course, in the wrong hands, with an IP address and no security, that baby monitor all of a sudden becomes an audio/video surveillance tool. No big deal unless, say, that new mom or dad works in the President’s office, NORAD, banking or any one of a number of businesses where you really wouldn’t want to let sensitive information out via casual conversation around a dinner table – with the baby monitor catching every word.

Finally, how about the car – a ubiquitous item (in many countries) of which the newer ones are just chock-full of various computer systems, some of which talk to each other, some of which don’t, some of which are supposed to talk to each other but don’t (anyone played with the Cadillac CUE lately?). All these systems are there to make the driving experience either better or safer. One of these is simply brilliant – the Tire Pressure Monitoring System (TPMS) reports pressures to the primary automotive ECU, keeping the owner informed of poorly-inflated tires (when appropriate). By definition, these systems have to be wireless – and unfortunately, they are completely unsecured. What if someone was within range (say the car behind you) and used the same set of APIs that power the TPMS to send invalid data to the ECU – thereby potentially shutting down the car or, worse, making it unsafe?

All of these examples sound outlandish, right? And yeah, they are.

Oh and they’re also all true. The remarkable Robert Vamosi details these exploits, along with many others, in his phenomenal book When Gadgets Betray Us (available on Amazon here). Writing at a layperson’s level, Vamosi details time and time again how the emergence of IoT consistently takes security for granted or ignores it completely. It’s a scary bedtime story but worth reading. And it’s worth taking note of the key lesson: In IoT, security is very, very important.

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