August 26th, 2013

Layer 7 Mobile Access Gateway 2.0

Mobile Access Gateway 2.0Today, Layer 7 introduced version 2.0 of the Mobile Access Gateway, the company’s top-of-the-line API Gateway. The Mobile Access Gateway is designed to help enterprises solve the critical mobile-specific identity, security, adaptation, optimization and integration challenges they face while developing mobile apps or opening APIs to app developers. In the new version, we have added enhancements for implementing Single Sign-On (SSO) to native enterprise apps via a Mobile SDK for Android and iOS.

Too many times, we have seen the effect of bad security practices. My colleague Matt McLarty eloquently discusses the gulf between developers on one hand and enterprise security teams on the other in this Wired article on Tumblr’s security woes. Because these two groups have different objectives, it becomes hard to get a common understanding of how you can secure the enterprise while enabling app developers to build new productivity-enhancing apps. While nobody really wants to be the fall guy who lets a flaw take down a business, we can be sure Tumblr isn’t the last stumble we are going to see.

To prevent you being the next Stumblr, we have taken a closer look at the technologies and practices for authentication of users and apps. No one of these seemed to be adequate alone and – while acknowledging the value of leveraging existing technologies –  we realized that a new approach was needed.

For mobile app security, there are three important entities that need to be addressed: users, apps and devices. Devices are the focus of the MDM solutions many enterprises are adopting and although these solutions are good at securing data at rest they fail to address the other two entities adequately.

Because today’s enterprise apps use APIs to consume data and application functionality that is located behind the company firewall or in the cloud, API security is vital to the success of any enterprise-level Mobile Access program. Therefore, APIs must be adequately secured and access to API-based resources must be controlled via fine-grained policies that can be implemented at the user, app or device level. To achieve this, the organization must be able to deal with all three entities.

Based on this, we have proposed a new protocol that leverages existing technologies. We leverage PKI for identifying devices through certificates, OAuth 2.0 is used to grant apps access tokens and finally OpenID Connect is used to grant user tokens. This new approach, described in our white paper Identity in Mobile Security,  provides SSO for native apps and makes sure the handshake is done with a purpose – to set up mutual SSL for secure API consumption.

Furthermore, this framework is adaptable to changing requirements because new modules can replace or add to existing protocols. For example, when an organization has used an MDM solution to provision devices, the protocol could leverage this instead of generating new certificates. Equally, in some high-security environments, the protocol should be able to leverage certificates embedded in third-party hardware.

To simplify the job for app developers, the Mobile Access Gateway now ships with a Mobile SDK featuring libraries that implement the client side of the handshake. The developer will only have to call a single API on the device with a URL path for the resource as its parameter. If the device is not yet registered or there are no valid tokens, the client will do the necessary handshake to get these artifacts in place. This way, app developers can leverage cryptographic security in an easy-to-use manner, giving users and security architects peace of mind.

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