May 27th, 2014

Hybrid App Growth in the Enterprise: Lessons Learned at Gartner AADI

Gartner AADI 2014Last week, I was lucky enough to attend the latest Gartner Application Architecture, Development & Integration Summit in London. One of the key themes that emerged from this show was the need to create agile architectures for mobile apps that leverage enterprises’ backed systems. Architectural agility has long been a central concern for enterprise IT but it has taken on a new urgency with the mobile revolution. As all sorts of enterprises scramble to launch effective mobile app strategies, the issue of how to build agile architectures for the mobile domain is ever more pressing.

One of the key questions for architects charged with enabling enterprise app strategies is whether enterprises should be developing fully native mobile apps, building apps on Web standards like HTML5 or taking a hybrid approach. Based on the sessions I attended and my conversations with architects who are attempting to answer this question in the field, it is clear that each approach has its own advantages and pitfalls. The Web-centric approach enables enterprises to be quick-to-market – a significance advantage in the current climate. But HTML5 simply cannot deliver the kind of rich and seamless functionality offered by native apps.

Logically then, the hybrid approach would seem like the way to go. But even this has its disadvantages. For example, platform vendors like Apple and Google might impose more restrictive terms and conditions on hybrids. Furthermore, hybrid apps retain many of the disadvantages of a Web-centric approach. Hybrids can never deliver the full native experience users prefer and they create significant testing and security challenges. And it’s quite possible that, at some point in the future, mobile development tools could improve to the point where hybrids are no quicker or cheaper to deploy than native apps.

Nevertheless, hybrid apps have significant advantages. First and foremost, the hybrid approach turns the whole “Web-versus-native” binary into a continuum, allowing sophisticated trade-offs to be made between cost/time-to-market and functionality. Furthermore: tools to create hybrid apps are well understood and widely available; unlike pure HTML5 apps, hybrids allow a presence in the app store for marketing purposes; hybrids allow some content and features to be updated without resubmitting the app to the store.

In light of all this, it seems clear to me that the hybrid approach will have a role to play in the ongoing development of enterprise mobility. Indeed, if I remember correctly, one study I heard mentioned said that, by 2016, over half of all mobile apps deployed will be hybrids – whereas less than a quarter were just a year ago. Still, hybrid apps won’t work for every use case and my advice to architects would be to make sure your architectural approach matches the needs and resources of your organization. And whatever approach you take, make sure that it is built on a technology platform that will allow the apps to run smoothly at scale, without impacting the security or performance of backend systems.

No Comments »

No comments yet.

RSS feed for comments on this post. TrackBack URL

Leave a comment