June 6th, 2014

APIs Fueling the Connected Car Opportunity

APIs Fueling the Connected Car OpportunityI just attended the Telematics Detroit 2014 conference, which was abuzz with mobile connectivity sessions and workshops. But the mobile conversation at this event was entirely in the context of the connected car, as opposed to the mobile phone.

The connected car has emerged as a real-world illustration of the opportunities presented to businesses and consumers by the Internet of Things (IoT). And – as you probably know – IoT is a hot topic right now.

Thilo Koslowski, Vice President & Distinguished Analyst at Gartner, who is known for his prediction making, claimed the car will be the most innovative and exciting mobile platform over the next 10-to-15 years. A bold statement but this goal is achievable and very much within reach.

The automobile industry has already made great strides and is quickly leveraging the business advantages offered by the digital economy. What once was considered to be a telematics and roadside assistance market has quickly transformed into fertile ground for mobile app development, with broad connectivity opportunities that will enhance the consumer’s overall digital lifestyle while delivering auto manufacturer efficiencies throughout the entire value chain.

While consumers continue to demand somewhat standard connectivity features such as navigation, maps and parking location services, there’s also a significant demand for advanced connectivity features such as the ability to make payments directly from the vehicle, remotely start the car or receive diagnostic information on a mobile device. There is also a willingness to share data with third parties, especially if this results in a better driving experience or cost savings.

But data sharing has privacy implications in this context, which could become a significant roadblock. A Gartner survey of automobile consumers uncovered that 61% respondents would not opt-in if too much information was taken. So, enabling this new world of connectivity in auto requires a balanced approach. Consumers want the convenience and personalized experience that connectivity offers but only if it doesn’t impact their rights and freedoms.

That’s where a proper API strategy makes a difference. APIs will become fundamental to any connected car strategy by enabling an ecosystem of drivers, vehicles and partners to share data in a way that will improve the consumer experience through better digital design, engagement and security.

To learn more, please read our new eBook: APIs Fueling the Connected Car Opportunity. This document outlines a number of key connected car use cases and explains how the proper API security and management solution will enable you to meet your connected car business and security objectives.

May 27th, 2014

Hybrid App Growth in the Enterprise: Lessons Learned at Gartner AADI

Gartner AADI 2014Last week, I was lucky enough to attend the latest Gartner Application Architecture, Development & Integration Summit in London. One of the key themes that emerged from this show was the need to create agile architectures for mobile apps that leverage enterprises’ backed systems. Architectural agility has long been a central concern for enterprise IT but it has taken on a new urgency with the mobile revolution. As all sorts of enterprises scramble to launch effective mobile app strategies, the issue of how to build agile architectures for the mobile domain is ever more pressing.

One of the key questions for architects charged with enabling enterprise app strategies is whether enterprises should be developing fully native mobile apps, building apps on Web standards like HTML5 or taking a hybrid approach. Based on the sessions I attended and my conversations with architects who are attempting to answer this question in the field, it is clear that each approach has its own advantages and pitfalls. The Web-centric approach enables enterprises to be quick-to-market – a significance advantage in the current climate. But HTML5 simply cannot deliver the kind of rich and seamless functionality offered by native apps.

Logically then, the hybrid approach would seem like the way to go. But even this has its disadvantages. For example, platform vendors like Apple and Google might impose more restrictive terms and conditions on hybrids. Furthermore, hybrid apps retain many of the disadvantages of a Web-centric approach. Hybrids can never deliver the full native experience users prefer and they create significant testing and security challenges. And it’s quite possible that, at some point in the future, mobile development tools could improve to the point where hybrids are no quicker or cheaper to deploy than native apps.

Nevertheless, hybrid apps have significant advantages. First and foremost, the hybrid approach turns the whole “Web-versus-native” binary into a continuum, allowing sophisticated trade-offs to be made between cost/time-to-market and functionality. Furthermore: tools to create hybrid apps are well understood and widely available; unlike pure HTML5 apps, hybrids allow a presence in the app store for marketing purposes; hybrids allow some content and features to be updated without resubmitting the app to the store.

In light of all this, it seems clear to me that the hybrid approach will have a role to play in the ongoing development of enterprise mobility. Indeed, if I remember correctly, one study I heard mentioned said that, by 2016, over half of all mobile apps deployed will be hybrids – whereas less than a quarter were just a year ago. Still, hybrid apps won’t work for every use case and my advice to architects would be to make sure your architectural approach matches the needs and resources of your organization. And whatever approach you take, make sure that it is built on a technology platform that will allow the apps to run smoothly at scale, without impacting the security or performance of backend systems.

December 10th, 2013

Layer 7 at Gartner AADI Las Vegas 2013

Gartner AADI 2013Last week, I attended the Gartner Application Architecture, Development & Integration Summit in Las Vegas for the third consecutive year. Aside from the cool alumni sticker on my attendee badge, returning annually to this conference also provides a really interesting touch-point with a familiar cross-section of potential (and existing) customers.

In past years, talking to other attendees during exhibit hours involved some amount of basic education around the value of APIs to enterprises, potential use cases and the need for security and management of those APIs. This year was a totally different experience, as there was no education necessary. Instead, I found these decision makers already informed – eager to implement or continue implementing their API strategies in order to achieve real-world mandates from their management and lines of business.

They told me about mobile initiatives requiring apps developed for customers, partners and/or employees; they talked about modernization of legacy infrastructure and a deeper embrace of hybrid cloud; they recognized the need for developer enablement and a shift toward continuous deployment. Most importantly for us, they recognized that APIs are essential to the successful deployment of each of these initiatives.

In a world quickly moving toward “software-defined everything,” they also acknowledged the importance of API security and management. Instead of asking why they would need our solution, they asked for differentiators in the marketplace and our latest innovations. I was happy to talk with them about the recently-released version 2.0 of our Mobile Access Gateway, which enables developers to focus on creating the best apps possible while maintaining an unprecedented level of end-to-end security from the native app to the enterprise datacenter.

We also talked about: advanced features in the latest releases of our Gateway and API Portal products; our unparalleled capabilities in security and integration; our recognition from analysts as leaders and innovators in the industry. And we talked about the future – what new technologies are being considered and how they’re going to transform the enterprise even further.

As 2013 comes to a close, this year is beginning to look like a turning point. This may be remembered as the year enterprises embraced the API, leading to a broad range of innovative programs. We’ve seen massive consolidation and investment in our space, including our own acquisition. APIs have certainly joined the mainstream. Now it’s time to see what great things we can help our customers accomplish. I’m really looking forward to 2014!

November 13th, 2013

QCon San Francisco 2013

QCon 2013This Thursday, I’ll be at QCon San Francisco to lead the RESTful Web APIs tutorial. This will be the second time QCon has hosted the full-day workshop and I’m very much looking forward to it. Most of the material I’ve prepared for this workshop is based on the book of the same name by Leonard Richardson and myself. That book was released in September of this year and we’ve been getting very positive feedback on it.

Participants in the workshop will learn how to design a hypermedia type, how to implement servers that safely and consistently expose business functionality using hypermedia and how to build client applications that understand the hypermedia messages and can interact with servers to create enjoyable user experiences.

Along the way several key principles will be explored, including:

  • Why a hypermedia-based message model is better than a code-based object model
  • How Web servers can expose operations as stateless resources instead of as function calls
  • How client applications can recognize and use hypermedia workflow to create quality user experiences
  • Why the hypermedia approach makes it easier to make small changes on the server without breaking existing client applications

The full-day session will also cover important technical aspects of implementing distributed applications over the Web. We will focus on identifying and managing the boundaries between services in order to increase both security and stability over the lifetime of the service. Attendees will get a chance to use existing services as a guide when creating their own and will even get a chance to introduce changes on the backend to see how their client applications can adapt and continue to function.

I always enjoy these extended workshops because it gives everyone (even myself) a chance to write real-life code for real-life services. I spend quite a bit of my time lecturing and advocating for increased reliance on adaptable distributed systems and it’s a rewarding experience. However, it’s also very energizing to work with people in a hands-on atmosphere where everyone is focused on getting things up and running in a working environment.

Of course, there will be lots of fun in the day, too. We have trivia breaks, I offer some handy prizes and we have plenty of time to relax and get to know each other. Overall, these full-day, hands-on workshops represent one of my favorite ways to spend a day with smart, talented people. And I’m grateful to the folks at QCon who make it all possible.

So, if you’re in San Francisco this Thursday and don’t have anything pressing to do, come on over to QCon and join us. Bring your laptop loaded with your favorite Web coding tools and your thinking cap. We’ve got a place all ready for you.

November 7th, 2013

The Software-Defined Telco

Software Defined TelcoBack in 2011, Marc Andreessen famously stated that “software is eating the world” and predicted that – over the subsequent decade – almost every major industry would be disrupted and transformed by software and the innovations of Silicon Valley. Just over two years later, it’s pretty clear he was right on the money. In order to remain relevant, many industrial behemoths need to transform themselves and they are looking at the software revolution as a way to enable a fresh wave of innovation and development.

This revolution has never been more important to the telco world, where it must start at the very core of the organization. Every layer – from network, to infrastructure, to application – should be considered a service enabler, be defined in software and be driven by APIs. A new wave of thought leadership and investment around “network functions virtualization” (NFV) is acting as a catalyst for this transformation and telcos can finally start to eschew the limitations of legacy networks and allow operators to more easily keep pace with Silicon Valley.

Finally then, APIs and API platforms can regain their intended utility in the telecommunications sector, emerging from a meandering journey through failed open developer ecosystems and misguided monetization strategies. APIs are meant to be at the very core of product development, they are supposed to be the foundation of a product or service and not tacked on the side afterwards. APIs enable an architectural paradigm that is essential to the software-defined network and they provide a scalable, documented and secure way of integrating systems and clients.

Layer 7 will be presenting a vision for the future of APIs in the software-defined telco at the Telecom APIs event in London (Nov 11 – 13) and the Telecom Application Developer Summit in Bangkok (Nov 21 – 22).