August 29th, 2014

360 Reasons to Attend API360 Summit in DC on Sept. 12

API360 SpeakersWe are two weeks away from the API360 Summit in Washington, DC. This event will examine the state of the industry in APIs, with a particular focus on the impact of open data and open APIs in the public sector.

We have a phenomenal lineup of participants, including:

  • Gray Brooks, who will describe the importance of APIs to the groundbreaking efforts of the federal government’s digital services delivery program, 18F
  • The API Evangelist himself, Kin Lane, who will moderate panels on open APIs and open data
  • Sanjay Motwani, who will tell the story of the API program at The Advisory Board Company, a leading healthcare research and consulting firm
  • Michael Prichard, Co-Founder & CTO at WillowTree Apps, who will give a client-side perspective on the importance of APIs and good API design

All the panelists are equally excellent and we hope to provide as many API perspectives as possible, while giving you – the attendee – the opportunity to interact and share your views in real time. We still have a few seats left and would love to see you there.

P.S. I would also like to let you know that our second API360 Summit will take place in London on November 18. Expect to see an announcement in mid-September.

August 21st, 2014

3 Philosophies for the IoT Age

IoT eBook“What on earth do pillars of science have to do with IoT?” That’s a question I’ve had to answer a few times since the publication of our latest CA Layer 7 eBook, 3 Philosophies for the IoT Age. At first glance, some people have been a little taken aback at the idea that we’re comparing the Internet of Things to the work of great theoretical physicists like Isaac Newton, Albert Einstein and Niels Bohr (the founding father of quantum mechanics). What’s the deal here?

Anyone who digs a bit deeper into the document will quickly realize that this comparison refers to IT architecture broadly, rather than IoT specifically and – crucially – that it’s not supposed to be taken too literally. It’s a metaphor, folks! And as a metaphor, I think it works rather well – with Newton representing traditional on-premise architecture, Einstein representing the vast expanse of the Web and Bohr representing the billions of little connections that make up IoT.

While I’m pretty pleased with these analogies, I can’t really claim responsibility for them. The original idea came from my API Academy colleague Mike Amundsen. I took Mike’s idea and ran with it during a talk I gave at APIdays in San Francisco then fleshed it out a bit in the eBook. The more I looked at it, the more connections I could see between IoT and Bohr’s view of a dense, chaotic molecular universe.

I also believe Mike’s physics metaphor has a practical application. IoT is becoming such a big deal that it’s pretty much guaranteed to generate a wealth of business opportunities. But business leaders and IT experts currently have little insight into what this will actually involve. It’s my hope that the eBook will provide a framework for these folks to start exploring what the opportunities are and what the technical requirements for realizing these opportunities will be.

So, if you’re beginning to think about what IoT will mean for your business, 3 Philosophies for the IoT Age might just help to set you off in the right direction.

August 8th, 2014

Notes from the W3C Workshop on the Web of Things

W3C LogoAt the end of June, I had the opportunity to attend the W3C Workshop on the Web of Things, in Berlin. I saw some fascinating presentations and had some equally engaging one-to-one conversations. This was a great opportunity to learn about some new innovations around connected devices and the Internet of Things.

In particular, I was very intrigued by the WAMP Protocol, which I had not heard about before attending the workshop. I subsequently contacted Tobias Eberstein from Tavendo, who is one of the key maintainers of WAMP. We had a very interesting conversation about some of WAMP’s unique concepts, which I will talk about more in a future blog post.

In the meantime, here is a quick summary of my notes from the presentations I attended and the conversations I had at the workshop. If you would like to get more information on any of the emerging technologies outlined below, you can view some of the workshop presentations here and here.

Siemens Smart Grid
Siemens has chosen to use the XMPP messaging protocol as the standard for its smart grid technology. XMPP is being used because IoT, like online messaging, is based on distributed collaboration, in real-time, spanning multiple domains. In this sense, IoT is fundamentally closer to social media than it is to SOA-style Web services.

Siemens Connected Car Authentication
Siemens also presented an IoT authentication method, using the connected car as its real-world example. In this method, security concerns are separated between a Web API server and the car’s backend server. Client apps communicate with the car indirectly, via the API server. Sensitive vehicle data cannot be accessed directly via the API server.

EXI for Long-Lived Connected Things
Waste could be a serious problem in IoT. With billions of connected devices, we can’t afford to have anything becoming obsolete too quickly – ideally any given device should last at least five years. The Efficient XML Interchange (EXI) format addresses this by using XML schema to enable binary coding for extensible message formats.

Echonet Lite for Client-Side Energy Demand Management
The Echnonet Lite protocol allows smart meters to communicate with home appliances, enabling smart home energy management. Echnonet Lite is UDP-based and has more than 80 device models defined. It is already widely used in Japan and is starting to gain significant traction outside the Asia-Pacific region.

Sony Web API Server
Sony is working on a Web API server for the Android platform, using the previously-mentioned WAMP protocol. WAMP, which is essentially a sub-protocol of WebSocket, combines RPC-style and SubPub semantics.

IBM NodeRED
IBM’s NodeRED is an integrated development and runtime environment based on node.js. In the NodeRED environment, it is possible to design integration flows without resorting to code, by graphically snapping together components. NodeRed also allows the use of JavaScript to act on or transform data in flows.

July 17th, 2014

API360 Summit – Washington, DC

API360Since the API Academy was founded two years ago, we have had the pleasure of helping numerous organizations and industry leaders succeed with their API programs. Through this experience, we have learned at least as much as we have taught – and we recognize that continuing this collaboration is vital to furthering the field of API strategy and design. Also in this time, we have observed a growing recognition that a holistic approach to APIs is needed in order to achieve maximum benefit.

With all of this in mind, we are pleased to announce our API360 Summit series. These complimentary one-day summits will bring together industry leaders to examine APIs from every possible perspective: business and innovation; architecture and design; applications and trends. Most importantly, these events will provide attendees with up-to-date, actionable information they can start using as soon as they walk out the door at the end of the day.

Our first API360 Summit will take place on September 12 at the Newseum in Washington, DC. We will be featuring a range of speakers with first-hand experience of how APIs are impacting organizations across the public and private sectors. There will also be panel sessions examining pertinent topics like using APIs in open government and exposing APIs to external developers. And there will be plenty of opportunities for interaction and discussion.

For more information and free registration please visit the API360 site.

July 16th, 2014

The Maker Manifesto

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The Maker ManifestoOne of the few perks of having to travel for work is the opportunity to read books (remember those?), from cover to cover, in one go. I recently had the chance to read The Maker Manifesto by Mark Hatch, the CEO of TechShop. It is one of those rare books that make you want to jump up and start “making” something (which isn’t very practical when you happen to be on an airplane, I admit). But I will talk about this more in a minute.

I’ve been struggling lately with the overbearing Internet of Things (IoT) coverage and hype. All the ingenuity and potential seems to becoming increasingly directed towards creating yet another platform for advertising. Most if not all IoT presentations start out by citing the same one or two studies talking about billions of devices and trillions of dollars just beyond the horizon (I call it the x+1 syndrome – it is always one year out). This is usually followed by promises about how this or that gadget/protocol/framework/alliance is going to liberate us from our earthly burdens like switching off lights or turning on the coffee maker.

Of course, everything is open to debate but I personally prefer my simple wall-mounted light switch over having to pull out my smart phone and tap on an app.

In these challenging moments it is refreshing to remind myself what has drawn my interest to IoT in the first place. For me, the Internet of Things is simply a term describing a much deeper and more fundamental shift in society. And this shift – or rather the anticipation of this shift – is being called the “Internet of Things” in IT circles, the “Industrial Internet” by GE and the “Fourth Industrial Revolution” (aka “Industry 4.0”) in Germany. Meanwhile, The Economist and the previously-mentioned maker movement have been throwing around the term “artisan entrepreneur”.

The common theme across all of these manifestations is that technology is democratizing the way things are made. Maker-centric technologies like 3D printing could vastly increase the number of people who have direct access to the manufacturing process – which could be truly revolutionary.

To catch a glimpse of the future, look no further than Etsy, which has made a billion-dollar-plus business from selling individually-made crafts. And for what it’s worth, Etsy’s engineering blog is one of the finest – I love their mantra “Code as Craft”.

This brings me back to The Maker Manifesto. While Mark Hatch is coming at it from a maker perspective, someone could (and maybe should) have written a very similar book from a software perspective. Cloud IT, HTML5, Javascript, Node.js, Raspberry Pi, Arduino, GitHub – these are the tools for the coming “software maker” revolution. Both books would meet where our ability to create, to make is only limited by our imagination – and where individuals will be able to provide viable alternatives to industrial-scale production. It is my conviction that the Internet of Things describes the “place” where both software and hardware makers will meet. Having skills in both areas will become key to unlocking IoT’s potential.

It’s worth noting here that Hatch points to an emerging type of company that is built on software but reliant on a physical delivery platform. This is particularly prominent in the “sharing economy” created by companies like Uber, Airbnb and Getaround. It is a demonstration of how combining software with physical things like spare rooms and idle cars can be hugely disruptive to the way real-world products and services are delivered.

You might wonder where APIs are in all this. Well, just as cloud computing commoditized access to compute and storage resources, APIs are democratizing access to all manner of data and application functionality. Organizations across the private and public sectors are using APIs to open their information assets for use by external developers. In turn, these developers are creating apps that make previously siloed corporate information assets available to a vast number and variety of people.

As new hardware and software technologies combine with IoT and the good-old-fashioned physical world, APIs will be the glue that holds everything together. And – of course – API Management technology will be there to make sure it all happens securely and efficiently.