Ross Garrett

Ross Garrett

Ross Garrett is the Director of Product Marketing for Layer 7, where he is responsible for market strategy and positioning of the Layer 7 API Management Suite across various industry verticals. Ross has almost 10 years of product leadership experience, helping service providers and other large enterprises turn their network services into open platforms, building API-oriented systems and embracing APIs as the leading edge of development and innovation. He is based in the Mile-High City of Denver, Colorado.

May 27th, 2014

Hybrid App Growth in the Enterprise: Lessons Learned at Gartner AADI

Gartner AADI 2014Last week, I was lucky enough to attend the latest Gartner Application Architecture, Development & Integration Summit in London. One of the key themes that emerged from this show was the need to create agile architectures for mobile apps that leverage enterprises’ backed systems. Architectural agility has long been a central concern for enterprise IT but it has taken on a new urgency with the mobile revolution. As all sorts of enterprises scramble to launch effective mobile app strategies, the issue of how to build agile architectures for the mobile domain is ever more pressing.

One of the key questions for architects charged with enabling enterprise app strategies is whether enterprises should be developing fully native mobile apps, building apps on Web standards like HTML5 or taking a hybrid approach. Based on the sessions I attended and my conversations with architects who are attempting to answer this question in the field, it is clear that each approach has its own advantages and pitfalls. The Web-centric approach enables enterprises to be quick-to-market – a significance advantage in the current climate. But HTML5 simply cannot deliver the kind of rich and seamless functionality offered by native apps.

Logically then, the hybrid approach would seem like the way to go. But even this has its disadvantages. For example, platform vendors like Apple and Google might impose more restrictive terms and conditions on hybrids. Furthermore, hybrid apps retain many of the disadvantages of a Web-centric approach. Hybrids can never deliver the full native experience users prefer and they create significant testing and security challenges. And it’s quite possible that, at some point in the future, mobile development tools could improve to the point where hybrids are no quicker or cheaper to deploy than native apps.

Nevertheless, hybrid apps have significant advantages. First and foremost, the hybrid approach turns the whole “Web-versus-native” binary into a continuum, allowing sophisticated trade-offs to be made between cost/time-to-market and functionality. Furthermore: tools to create hybrid apps are well understood and widely available; unlike pure HTML5 apps, hybrids allow a presence in the app store for marketing purposes; hybrids allow some content and features to be updated without resubmitting the app to the store.

In light of all this, it seems clear to me that the hybrid approach will have a role to play in the ongoing development of enterprise mobility. Indeed, if I remember correctly, one study I heard mentioned said that, by 2016, over half of all mobile apps deployed will be hybrids – whereas less than a quarter were just a year ago. Still, hybrid apps won’t work for every use case and my advice to architects would be to make sure your architectural approach matches the needs and resources of your organization. And whatever approach you take, make sure that it is built on a technology platform that will allow the apps to run smoothly at scale, without impacting the security or performance of backend systems.

February 18th, 2014

A World of Apps & APIs

Apps WorldApplications – and specifically mobile apps – occupy a key battleground for companies trying to woo customers, differentiate their products and drive growth. This is happening across many industries but banking provides a good example. Mobile applications that put banking services in the palm of your hand have become a much more important differentiator than interest rates, which were previously used to lure customers. A well-designed mobile app drives a more engaging experience for customers and this, in turn, drives customer acquisition and retention.

During the recent Apps World show in San Francisco, we saw some examples of this trend and the extraordinary growth right across the application ecosystem. Of course, behind every great app there’s usually a great API and my “State of the Union” address on APIs highlighted the hard work and success we’ve seen over the past few years. But it also served as a reflection on the key areas enterprises much consider as they accelerate innovation via APIs and engage customers in new ways.

Identity and security were recurring themes and we’ll certainly be hearing more about these issues in the coming months. With public awareness of mobile exploits and loss of personal information growing fast, mobile app security is going to dominate the thoughts not just of product managers everywhere but also those of lawmakers seeking to define stricter legislation to protect consumers.

In this context there’s an increasing need to double down on the fundamental requirement for strong-but-user-friendly identity and security functionality in mobile apps. For developers building apps against enterprise APIs, meeting this requirement can be extremely challenging. Thankfully, enterprises can simplify the situation by leveraging the advanced identity and security features of API Management platforms. Right now, app security is often a stumbling block but – by making some smart infrastructural decisions early on – enterprises can turn it into a serious differentiator.

November 7th, 2013

The Software-Defined Telco

Software Defined TelcoBack in 2011, Marc Andreessen famously stated that “software is eating the world” and predicted that – over the subsequent decade – almost every major industry would be disrupted and transformed by software and the innovations of Silicon Valley. Just over two years later, it’s pretty clear he was right on the money. In order to remain relevant, many industrial behemoths need to transform themselves and they are looking at the software revolution as a way to enable a fresh wave of innovation and development.

This revolution has never been more important to the telco world, where it must start at the very core of the organization. Every layer – from network, to infrastructure, to application – should be considered a service enabler, be defined in software and be driven by APIs. A new wave of thought leadership and investment around “network functions virtualization” (NFV) is acting as a catalyst for this transformation and telcos can finally start to eschew the limitations of legacy networks and allow operators to more easily keep pace with Silicon Valley.

Finally then, APIs and API platforms can regain their intended utility in the telecommunications sector, emerging from a meandering journey through failed open developer ecosystems and misguided monetization strategies. APIs are meant to be at the very core of product development, they are supposed to be the foundation of a product or service and not tacked on the side afterwards. APIs enable an architectural paradigm that is essential to the software-defined network and they provide a scalable, documented and secure way of integrating systems and clients.

Layer 7 will be presenting a vision for the future of APIs in the software-defined telco at the Telecom APIs event in London (Nov 11 – 13) and the Telecom Application Developer Summit in Bangkok (Nov 21 – 22).

April 10th, 2013

It’s All Over-the-Top with Amdocs

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Category Mobile Access, Telco
 

Layer 7 and AmdocsOver-the-top (OTT) applications have long been seen as a threat to telco service providers, who are obliged to deliver on insatiable bandwidth demands without realizing any commercial benefit from either the consumer/enterprise or the third-party app. This needn’t be the case and the limited participation from service providers in recent years really stems from a shortsighted view of partnerships.

Arguing about “who owns the customer” or that “our customers expect a certain level of service” is so far behind the curve it’s laughable and service providers simply can’t derail innovation by imposing expensive and exhausting procedures. But to be clear, this is a competitive market and service providers will lose more ground unless a contemporary model for collaboration is adopted.

The Amdocs OTT Monetization Solution allows service providers to leverage network assets to create value for OTT providers and monetize service collaborations. Layer 7’s API Management Suite of products defines a new methodology for telco APIs, bringing interface, identity and developer management together in a cohesive platform that can serve mobile, enterprise and internal applications equally. Layer 7 and Amdocs will be working together to deliver a best-of-breed solution, addressing the full lifecycle of telco API needs.

This new approach will yield great results. We have already seen Spotify implement a flat-rate service with T-Mobile Germany. Also, network-enhanced enterprise tools (e.g. AT&T Business Services) are becoming commonplace as LTE networks expand. APIs are the fabric that ensures these collaborations are possible and can be brought to market quickly and efficiently.

February 20th, 2013

Journey to the Center of the Mobile World

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Layer 7 at Mobile World CongressMobile World Congress – three words that strike fear into the hearts of marketing managers everywhere, for this is the largest mobile event of the year and we’re just a few days away from seeing 70,000 visitors descend upon Barcelona like a kettle of vultures, hungry for new innovations. This year, they will be treated to new hunting ground too, as MWC moves to a new, larger venue with more room for fresh meat. Before that metaphor gets completely worn out, let’s take a look at what we can actually expect from this year’s show.

As usual, we’re likely to see a very broad sweep across various areas of telco innovation and mobile strategy but there are some fundamental questions facing the community and these will dominate many conference sessions, seminars and exhibits:

  1. Connected Living
    As the Internet of Things gains momentum, how can the service provider community deliver the kind of enriched connectivity the broader ecosystem increasingly demands?
  2. Mobile Commerce
    For years, mobile has been a key banking and commerce tool for certain markets. With the rise of NFC (near field communication) and success stories like the Starbucks mobile payment app, will mobile become the preferred payment instrument for us all?
  3. Next-Generation Communications
    The world of communications moves quickly – too quickly even for service providers at times, with the runaway success of technologies of iMessage, WhatsApp and – next – WebRTC. In this ever-innovating world of mobile communications, can service providers regain some ground and demonstrate their value?

Layer 7 has answers to these questions and will be at MWC, demonstrating a variety of solutions that can help service providers address the challenges ahead. For example:

  1. We have been collaborating with AT&T and have planned an M2M solution that will capture anonymous information about visitors as they move around the exhibition halls. This information will be presented as intelligent APIs via the Layer 7 platform.
  2. Security and authentication are very familiar terms to Layer 7 and we’ll be showing how mobile payments can be easily and securely integrated with a mobile app without compromising the user experience.
  3. “Communications as a Service” opens many opportunities for service providers and the new partnership between Layer 7 and Voxeo Labs will show how easy it can be to capitalize on these opportunities.

Come and meet the team at booth 8.1A47 in the App Planet zone or email info@layer7.com to schedule a meeting. See you there!