August 13th, 2013

What ist DaaS?

DaaSWe live in the age of Big Data but Big Data is not showing up to the party alone. Fast data and open data are also coming along for the ride. This is why we need an “as-a-service” approach to data sharing. In a recent article for Big Data Republic, I explored the concept of data-as-a-service (DaaS) and some of the operational challenges associated with providing access to Big Data.

The fact that these challenges are not just theoretical considerations was driven home to me by one of our customers, who told me that he simply didn’t have enough IT cycles to keep writing and rewriting all those queries and APIs his customers were asking for.

Similarly another recent article on Big Data Republic, refered to three powerful drivers for machine learning identified by Tibco CTO Matt Quinn – drivers that I believe are equally relevant to data APIs:

  • “A surge of data being liberated from places where it was previously hidden (aka big data’s volume challenge)
  • A need for automation that manages the complexity of Big Data in an environment where humans have no time to intervene (aka Big Data’s velocity challenge)
  • An absolute requirement to create adaptable, less fragile systems that can manage the combination of structured and unstructured data without having a human write complex code and rules with each change (aka Big Data’s variety challenge)”

The efficiency gains and resulting agility and potential for innovation created by data-centric APIs are enormous – not just in respect to open data but also the ability to turn data into an active asset and monetize it. For an inspiring story, head over to Andorra via FastCompany.

Meanwhile, an interesting take on the way IoT is increasingly driving data democratization – and creating new governance challenges in the process – comes from  Christopher J. Rezendes and W. David Stephenson in an article at the HBR blog network. Naturally, the best place to implement and enforce data governance is in the API that provides access to the data.

Secure API design and management is not rocket science. Our API Academy is offering best practices and practical advice on everything from API design to API security to API lifecyle management (and yes, that includes versioning). And if you are curious about how Layer7′s API Management Suite can help your Big Data access challenge, download our Data Lens solution brief or contact me at hreinhardt@layer7.com.

August 9th, 2013

REST Fest 2013 is Coming!

REST Fest 2013It’s that time of year again! REST Fest 2013 is less than two months away (September 19-21) and preparations and are in full swing. Now in its fourth year, REST Fest has become one of my favorite events on the calendar and I’m very much looking forward to being involved with this year’s event.

REST is Just the Beginning
This year the keynote will be delivered by Brian Sletten. And – judging from the title (and my knowledge of Brian’s experience and knowledge) – it will be a great talk. We’re honored that Brian accepted our invitation and looking forward not just to his presentation but also the resulting converstations and explorations that are hallmarks of REST Fest.

Everybody Talks
An important part of REST Fest is the principle that everyone who shows up must give a presentation. The talks are typically quite short: a five-minute “lightning” talk followed by a short Q&A session. There are a few 30-minute  “featured talks”, too. But the basic idea is that we all get to talk about things that are interesting to us and we don’t have to make a big deal about it.

Every year, I probably learn more than 30 new ideas and novel approaches to problem solving and get to talk to the people who are coming up with these great things. REST Fest is a fantastic boost to my creative spirit!

Everybody Listens
The corollary to our key “talk” principle is that we all get to listen, too. And listening is, in my opinion, even more important than speaking. REST Fest attendees come from all sorts of backgrounds, experiences and points of view. The chance to hear how others view the Web space, how others are tackling problems and how others are advancing the practice of services on the Web is always an eye opener.

Less Theory, More Practice
And that leads to another key aspect of the weekend. The focus is on doing, not theorizing. We’re a decidely non-pedantic bunch and are usually much more interested in cool solutions than compelling theories. While it may still be common to think of anything with the REST acronym in the name to be a meeting of pointy-headed geeks, that’s not us. Each year, I get to see actual code solving actual problems in the real world.

We Hack, Too
Every year, we also host a hack day where everyone gets together to work on cool REST-related Web stuff. This year, Erik Mogensen will be leading the day. From what I’ve seen, he’s got some cool ideas in store for us, too.

It’s Easy to Join Us
Just as we cut down on the ceremony surrounding speaking and participating in a conference, we also try to eliminate the ceremony around signing up and showing up for REST Fest. It’s quite easy:

  1. Join our mailing list to see what we’re all about
  2. Drop into the IRC channel to chat us up
  3. Hop onto the GitHub wiki and create your “people page”
  4. Head over to the registration page and reserve your seat for the event

There’s no waiting to see if your talk was accepted; no wondering if what you’re working on would be interesting to some review committee. Just sign up, post your ideas and head down to sunny Greenville, SC for a great weekend.

Need More REST Fest NOW?
Can’t wait for RESTFEst 2013 to get started? Take a look at our Vimeo channel with all the talks from previous years. There’s lots of very cool stuff there.

See you in September!

(Originally published on my personal blog.)

August 2nd, 2013

Getting Mobile Mojo Through App Innovation: The Enterprise View

Mobile MojoAPIs first found their footing among consumer Web sites wanting to transform into platforms. APIs let Web sites foster developer communities that could build apps anchored to their services. Innovative apps would attract new users to the Web site, help keep existing users engaged and –with a little bit of luck – make some money.

APIs Engage Developers, Developers Build Apps, Apps Enable Innovation
This virtuous cycle of APIs and innovation does not have to be limited to consumer Web sites. Enterprises have countless data and application resources distributed across their datacenters. All of these could be opened to internal developers via APIs. Done right, this could drive development innovation. Internal programmers with access to diverse internal information resources could build more compelling mobile and cloud apps, in less time.

Centralize API Discovery Through a Directory
Enablement is the starting point for getting developers building better apps, faster. Apps need data and APIs provide the windows into data, both inside the enterprise and out in cloud. Finding the APIs that front the data sources which enrich mobile apps is no easy task. Back in the days of SOA, service directories emerged as the vehicle for helping developers find software service elements that could be reused and composed into diverse business processes.

An API portal can assume a similar role in providing a centralized point of API discovery and reuse in mobile. An API portal provides the core directory, developer management and developer collaboration features that aid mobile innovation. It presents information on what data resources are available and how these resources can be accessed, along with documentation, code samples and so on, all in a simple Web-based format.

Inside vs. Outside Developers
For some time, vendors have been making API portals available from the cloud, with an eye to aiding the external long-tail developer. But that same technology brought inside the datacenter can also be used by internal developers. While external developers can provide a forum for experimentation and education, the real ROI for most enterprises will occur inside the DMZ. Making internal developers building mobile apps productive and agile will help organizations deliver effective consumer and employee-facing apps faster.
But to do this, the API portal will need to be brought inside the firewall where the enterprise will be able manage internal developers securely. This will increase productivity, which will result in more and richer apps, in less time.

Powering the Internal Developer
Having seen the potential service directories had for organizing internal development efforts, Layer 7 has effectively bridged the lessons of SOA to mobile. The Layer 7 API Portal is unique in that it can support classic SOAP services along with newer REST interfaces and can be deployed 100% inside the datacenter. This enables enterprises to use API portals strategically – not just for powering external developer communities. By placing itself at the center of an internal app-building ecosystem, the Layer 7 API Portal can spur innovation across mobile development teams.

August 1st, 2013

Who Won’t Have an API?

Written by
 

API InfographicThat’s what we struggled to find out in our recent survey of enterprises. While we failed to canvass the North Koreans, it would seem the vast majority of enterprises in the developed world plan to implement an API program in one form or another. This probably helps – at least in part – to explain the surfeit of acquisition and funding-related news coverage the API Management sector has recently experienced

But what was perhaps most revelatory about Layer 7’s API survey and its accompanying infographic was that that it did not reveal any one leading driver for API publishing programs or any one implementation preference for API Management solutions.

Enterprises are using APIs for mobility, cloud, integration and developer programs. They are also deploying APIs from their datacenters, from the cloud and from hybrid environments. What that tells me is that flexibility should be the critical consideration for anyone evaluating the API Management alternatives.

(Full disclosure: Layer 7 offers the most flexible API delivery, management and security solution in the marketplace.)