June 29th, 2011

PCI-DSS Compliant Service Oriented Infrastructure

Category Uncategorized
 

The payment card industry data security standards (PCI-DSS) requires increased controls of cardholder information to minimize credit card fraud. Although PCI-DSS compliance is specific to the payment industry, the principles of securing user or subscriber information from leaks or cyber attacks apply to most service providers, enterprises and governments. Such principles have been core to the Layer 7 Gateway solution since its inception.

With its runtime policy enforcement and application level awareness, the Layer 7 Gateway is becoming a preferred component of your PCI-DSS compliant infrastructure. Acting at the perimeter of a service zone, the Layer 7 Gateway authenticates, authorizes and encrypts communications with external entities. Through various pattern recognition mechanisms, the Layer 7 Gateway inspects outgoing messages to filter out unwanted cardholder information leaking from internal systems.

With version 6.0 of the Layer 7 Gateway, Layer 7 Technologies goes beyond encryption and information scrubbing to provide PCI-DSS specific functionality such as a new auditing subsystem which facilitates the obfuscation of card holder information from system logs and audit traces. Version 6.0 of the Layer 7 Gateway also now includes a PCI-DSS Secure Implementation Guide (SIG) manual which covers all the PCI-DSS compliance related settings (you can find this manual from our support portal).


June 27th, 2011

LulzSec Disbands

Written by
Category Hacking, Security
 

“Live Fast, die young, and leave a good-looking corpse” was first uttered by actor John Derek in Knock on any Door,a 1949 film also staring Humphrey Bogart. This irresistible catchphrase has inspired generations of rebels from film to music to out-of-control teenagers. It also seems to have been taken to heart by the hacker collective LulzSec, which after a spectacular 50-day blitz across the Internet, is dissolving back into the shadowy back alleys from which it appeared. And just as James Dean—another famous adherent to the formula—did for film, so too have LulzSec changed the face of IT security and left an inspirational challenge for hacking’s next generation.

What is interesting about LulzSec isn’t necessarily their technique but their PR. The group appeared on the heels of high profile hacks by Anonymous and fed masterfully into a media-fueled hack-steria, feeding a public imagination over-stimulated with big audacious exploits that make great copy. LulzSec was the perfectly-timed counterpoint to Anonymous—gang fights equaling news that writes itself, whether the conflict is between thugs, dancers, graffiti writers, or hackers. And slipping away before being caught (sans one alleged member) ties this story up neatly into a narrative made to entertain. I’ve no doubt the movie rights will be bid sky-high.

If LulzSec can make claim to a legacy, then surely it is that effective marketing is just as important as the hack itself. LulzSec went from zero to global brand in a scant 50 days—a success that most marketing gurus can only dream of. In its wake, the collective leaves a somewhat heightened awareness of the terrible cost of security breaches among the general public. Their means to this end, of course, remain dubious; most hackers claim the same as a knee-jerk justification of their actions, though few are as wildly successful as LulzSec has been.

Nevertheless, no CEO wants to be subject to the negative publicity endured by Sony, which has suffered wave-after-wave of successful cyber attack. It is safe to say that LulzSec has dragged Internet security back into the executive suite, something which seemed almost unthinkable only a few months ago. The intelligent response to this new attention should be an increased emphasis on basic IT security foundations.


June 2nd, 2011

Defense Department Contractors Targeted

In the last week Lockheed Martin, then L-3 Communications Holdings have been in the news due to sophisticated cyber attacks on their networks by unknown actors. Now there are rumors that Northrop Grumman may have been targeted as well, since the company shut down remote access to the company's network. Are these events linked to the attack on RSA which was reported on May 17th?

For those that haven't been keeping up, it is assumed the adversaries responsible for the RSA intrusion may have access to the seed files, serial numbers and the algorithm for multiple RSA keyfobs used by over 40 million RSA customers worldwide. Although RSA is saying that this information alone can't be used to launch an attack, it's not hard to assume that the attackers either already have or are confident they can get what they needed to use the stolen RSA information to launch a successful attack.

This recent activity goes beyond the need for "cleanup on isle 9", and leads one to believe that all these events could be the start to a series of attacks which were extensively planned, beginning with the RSA attack, and are now and will continue to be well resourced. Given the high profile nature of the businesses being targeted, and the level of effort involved, I think it's safe to assume that we will see more from these attackers in the future. In an effort to better prepare ourselves for future attacks here are some questions needing answers:

  1. What data were the attackers after and why?
  2. How did those companies get exploited?
  3. Were there signs prior to the exploitation attempts?
  4. Was there active reconnaissance of the company or their users?
  5. Were there exploitation attempts against their users that failed?
  6. Were there exploitation attempts against the company network?
  7. Is the RSA attack and these incidents truly linked?

VPN access, albeit a necessity for remote users, is a major security risk that needs to be actively monitored. One of the initial steps in conducting network defense is to define the enclave’s borders which is increasingly difficult because of the needs of remote users and the federations across organizations. Each access point of a network needs to be heavily monitored and the systems that are used to access the VPN need to be examined on a regular basis to ensure there is no malicious software located on their systems. Given the current trend to move to the cloud one begins to wonder where the enterprise starts and stops and how we can truly protect the enterprise from the perimeter.

Reference:

http://www.eweek.com/c/a/Security/Northrop-Grumman-L3-Communications-Hacked-via-Cloned-RSA-SecurID-Tokens-841662/

http://www.informationweek.com/news/government/security/229700151

http://www.lockheedmartin.com/news/press_releases/2011/0528hq-secuirty.html