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April 17th, 2014

Next API Tech Talk: Linked APIs

Linked APIsThe challenges faced by today’s software architects go far beyond the familiar. “Big Data” means more than managing petabytes of data – it requires dealing with data-sets that span organizational boundaries. Likewise, the term “distributed system” no longer refers to just a multi-tier architecture or cloud deployment – it usually involves the connection of non-heterogeneous systems across multiple organizations.

On Thursday April 24, I’ll discuss these challenges as part of Layer 7’s latest API Tech Talk. I’ll be using this opportunity to explore how architects can leverage “linked APIs” to handle Big Data sets and distributed systems that cross organizational, technological and cultural boundaries, breaking through data silos in order to better integrate information. Interested? Just add the Tech Talk to your calendar and go to api.co/L7live at 9am PDT (12pm EDT) next Thursday.

I’ll also be taking your questions on linked APIs, Big Data, distributed systems, open source and anything related, so please don’t hesitate to join in. You can submit your questions now by email or you can chat with me or tweet them at me on the day. This will be my first Tech Talk since joining the Layer 7 API Academy and I’m really, really looking forward to a lively discussion. See you on April 24!

April 10th, 2014

Upcoming Talks at MobileWeek 2014 in NYC

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MobileWeek 2014I will be attending MobileWeek 2014 in New York City next Monday, April 13. I’ll be at the conference all day, so drop by and say hello. Part way through the day, I’ll  deliver a two-minute lightning talk on mobile authentication, followed by a panel on enterprise mobile security and scalability.

The lightning talk is at 12:25 pm:

How to Make Mobile Authentication Dead Easy
Are your developers struggling to integrate mobile apps and enterprise data? They shouldn’t be! In just two minutes, learn the easiest way to get end-to-end security between your mobile apps and the enterprise — all without using a VPN.

It must be easy if I can cover it in only two minutes!

The panel, scheduled to start at 1:10pm (an odd time, so keep an eye on the clock), will include participants from Hightail and will be moderated by Geoff Domoracki, who is one of the conference founders:

The Mobile Enterprise: Productivity, Security & Scalability
We hear terms like “mobile enterprise” and “mobile workforce” but how far are we towards creating an enterprise work environment that enables real-time communication beyond geographic boundaries — freeing the employee to work from his phone anywhere in the world? This panel will explore the opportunities and challenges around the emergence of a “mobile enterprise” where sitting at a desk in the office is becoming more and more outdated. How do you share documents, secure data, prove identity and geo-collaborate in the new mobile enterprise?

Overall it looks to be a good day. New York is a hotbed of mobile development and I’m looking forward to meeting lots of interesting people.

See you at MobileWeek!

April 4th, 2014

API Academy Goes to Asia

API Academy in AsiaStarting April 4, I’ll be on the road for close to two weeks. Along the way, I will have the honor of bringing the API Academy message of developer-focused, enterprise-scale API design and implementation to the cites of Seoul, Tokyo and Singapore. In each of these cities, we’ll be hosting a free half-day seminar covering some of the most popular topics the API Academy’s private, onsite training offers to companies the world over.

I will also have the chance to do some additional presentations and make new connections while on this trip. As much as I enjoy the workshops, it is the chance to connect with people I’ve only known online and to meet new ones that really makes these trips a great experience.

WWW 2014 in Seoul
While in Seoul, I will have the honor of presenting a peer-reviewed paper to the WS-REST2014 workshop, which is part of the World Wide Web Conference in Seoul. It is not often that I get the opportunity to speak at events of this caliber and I am also looking forward to catching up with several people who work on W3C projects – people I rarely get to meet in person.

There will also be an informal meet-up in Seoul on the evening of April 8 near the COEX complex where the WWW 2014 event is to be held and not far from the API Academy public workshop on the April 9. I don’t have all the details yet and promise to post them as soon as I have them.

RESTful Web APIs in Tokyo
I am very excited to announce that I will be attending a RESTful Meetup in Tokyo the evening of April 12. This was organized, in part, by a group of people who have also been hosting a bi-weekly reading group for the book RESTful Web APIs.

This group popped up last year to allow people to come together and translate the English-language edition of RESTful Web APIs in “real time” by taking turns reading the content and then discussing it as a group. Leonard Richardson and I are very grateful for this kind of enthusiasm and I am looking forward to meeting some of the people behind this cool project.

Singapore
I will arrive in Singapore on Monday, April 14 and don’t have any additional meetups scheduled yet. If you’re in Singapore and want to set up something, ping me and let’s see if we can get something going while I am in town for the public workshop on April 15.

Okay, Let’s Go!
The chance to visit customers, developers and designers in Seoul, Tokyo and Singapore really has me energized. If you’ve not yet signed up for one of the public workshops, please do. And come up and tell me “hello”. I’d love to hear about what you’re working on and how the API Academy can learn from your experience and help you reach your goals for building great applications for the Web and the enterprise.

(This post was originally published on my personal blog.)

April 3rd, 2014

Mobile Access Gateway 2.1 is Here!

Mobile Access GatewayLast week, we launched the Mobile Access Gateway 2.1 in style. The team has worked hard over the past few months to make sure the new features are coming together in a meaningful way. So, what’s in the new release?

First, we now allow customers to configure the usage of SiteMinder Session Cookies, with the Mobile SDK. In fact, the client libraries can use just about any token as the user token without breaking the existing model where we provision and manage token artifacts for users, apps and devices. With 2.1, you can use SiteMinder Session Cookies, SAML, JWT or any other user token. The Gateway administrator can configure what is relevant for the use case. As we know, there is a huge base of SiteMinder users who should now consider the Mobile Access Gateway as their mobility toolkit.

Second, the Mobile Access Gateway now supports social login for mobile apps. Social login support on the Gateway empowers developers to build apps that allow users to securely identify themselves by using sign-on credentials from social network platforms like Google Accounts, Salesforce, LinkedIn and Facebook. The social login flow is supported by the Gateway’s mobile Single Sign-On (SSO) capability. With mobile SSO and social login enabled, users login once with their social account credentials to access multiple enterprise and third-party applications from a mobile device. Additional contextual data such as geolocation can be combined with social login to provide a more secure API.

Third, with the 2.1 release, we now support Adobe PhoneGap. By leveraging the Cordova plugin interface, hybrid apps can tie in to the SSO and mutual SSL session negotiated by the native client libraries. This way, there is a unified security model for native and hybrid apps and app developers can choose to code application logic with their preferred tool chains.

Together with the existing Mobile Access Gateway features, this release provides app developers with better tools for writing awesome and secure mobile apps.

April 2nd, 2014

The Next Big Thing is Small

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The Next Big Thing is SmallOne of the challenges facing the tech community is the addition of tens of billions of Internet-connected devices over the next few years. Currently, this Internet of Things (IoT) is expected to grow from 20 billion connected devices in 2015 to 40 billion in 2020.

That’s a Lot of Things
Estimates vary widely but most agree we have something less than 10 billion connected devices today including computers, handhelds, cars and controller devices such as SCADA and others. So, adding tens of billions more in just a few short years is definitely going to present some challenges.

A Lot of Little Things
And – if you start to think about wearables, RFID and micro/nano-size items, you realize that billions of these devices are going to be quite small. Not just physically but also in terms of capability and capacity. These devices will not have the power or flexibility of a laptop or even a handheld mobile phone.

These new members of the “connected community” will be tiny, single-purpose, low-power devices that do one thing and do it well. And it is likely that the program-ability of these devices will be limited. You might be able to flash the memory or even tweak configurations but a good number of these devices will not be hosts to custom code the way Web servers and handhelds are today.

Yet, we still need these devices to work together – even if only to publish device data, consume data from others devices and react to outside stimulus (lights on/off, heat, air movement etc.) So, how will we do that? How can we get things to interact with each other?

Step-by-Step Programming
Most developers today write “code” by stringing long lists of imperative statements together into a coherent set of instructions for machines. To most developers “programming” is just that – providing step-by-step instructions. This means we take on responsibility for any mishaps along the way, whether they occur due to problems inherent in the instruction set or due to unexpected events outside the instruction set, such as other devices not responding to our requests or sending us unexpected data. Doing this on tiny devices with limited capacity and ability is going to be a problem.

Luckily, there is another way to “program” these devices.

Rules, Not Code
We can also use a rule-based approach to programming. In this paradigm, programmers establish a set of coherent rules that tell the device how to respond to outside stimulus (“if the lights are on do X else do Y” or “if the motion detector reports true then turn on the light” etc.) And that is all you do; you write simple rules and leave the device to its own…. well, devices.

This means “programs” are much smaller (just a set of rules), easier to debug and easier to safely modify. It also means the devices themselves don’t need to do a great deal of work in order to “act” according to the rules.

That’s what I mean by small. The code will be small; the code will be rules.

How Does That Help Us with IoT?
It seems unlikely that we’ll be able to “program” billions of devices to safely and successfully interact with each other if we have to constantly provide step-by-step instructions on how each one operates and how they all interoperate. Instead, we’ll rely on simple devices each of which does one thing well and makes its action history available (as a stream of data, occasional dumps etc.) to other authorized devices.

It is also important to keep in mind that these devices will not be “phoning home” asking servers for guidance on how to proceed. The amount of traffic that tens of billions of new devices might generate if they need to constantly get instructions from distant servers would be massive and a huge waste of time and bandwidth. Instead, most IoT devices will act on their own, making decisions in real time, using the rules provided to them.

So, This is a Big Deal, Right?
This way of thinking about how devices will work and how we will “program” them is a big change for many developers. But not all of them: There are people today who build “low-level” device handlers and other things that do pretty much what I describe here. Motion detectors, security systems etc. all operate on this model (simple rules executed in real time). The difference we’ll see in the near future is that more of us will need to start designing and coding for devices that use this rule-based model.

But yes, this is a big deal.

By the way, I see quite a number of people building “Internet of Things” apps and models still assuming that the devices will be high-powered, fully-programmable computers similar to today’s handhelds and laptops. This is a mistake. While there may be some IoT devices with that profile, I suspect it will be a very small minority of the projected 40 billion devices.

So, start thinking ahead. Start planning for a new way to program devices. Those who start working like this now will have a jump on their peers and competitors. And there is good reason to start contemplating this right away. Rule-based systems will require different training and even different tooling. Think about how this will affect the “test-driven development” movement and related practices. And that’s just one example.

Are There Examples of This “New” Kind of Programming?
Yes, there are. And I’ll pick up that thread in a future post.

(This post, which was originally published on my personal blog, covers material from my recent talk at the API Strategy Conference in Amsterdam. You can see the notes from my talk online, along with the slides and related videos.)